September 2008 Archives

Workspaces - Notpaper

Workspaces


1. :) by Perpetual*Bliss

After seeing pictures from the Custom Lunchbox Workshop on Uppercase, I remembered that I have been collecting some pictures of studios. I love how a collage artist's studio can look like a collage itself, so messy and so wonderful! Here are a few to inspire you to make your own mess!


2. Ocky Shapes by Practise
3. bits by display lady



4. Lunchtime via uppercase


5. Studio - Working by paper_whistle


6. untitled by anna melcon

Cless - Notpaper

Cless

The work of Cless is graphically gorgeous. So many elements are used in each one of his pieces, and it's the kind of work I could just stare at and analyze forever. He uses all kinds of graphic images and typographic elements, colours and styles. Still, he doesn't overdo it.

Cless
http://www.cless.info
(Born in Valladolid, currently live and work in) Madrid, Spain

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: Ultra chaos regarding meticulous structure.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: I work with magazines and images on the Internet. I like to pick up and use things from the streets. From small pieces of papers to torn books, magazines, cartons and wood etc.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: I started shyly over four years ago. I wanted to do it before when I was looking at typographic images on the web and I found some fascinating artists and work, so I am not sure why I didn't start then.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: I am a graphic designer and graffiti writer.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: No, none. My training comes from books, catalogues, zines, art exhibits, the Internet and other artists.

Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: I like to look at a magazine and see an image that pops out at you, when that happens I see the collage immediately. I love to cut up perfect images and then rip them apart to shreds and just keep cutting them up badly or just cut them up until the motive and purpose behind the perfect image is gone. Before, I used to work more with wearing out the images but now I do it in the background, experimenting more with depth, textures and with colours.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: I'm obsessed with all the cuts to fitting in perfectly, even though I'm the only one conscious of this perfection. I think one of my favourites is Serás aclamado como un héroe. It took four months until all the pieces were adjusted.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: From A to Z: Barry McGee, Charles Wilkin, Dadaism, David Carson, Eduardo Recife, Faile, Fluxus Collective, Frank Dresmé, Gary Taxaly, Greg Lamarche, Gregori Saavedra, Hobby Horse Crew, Jakob Printzlau, James Rosenquist, John Baldessari, Jorge Peligro, Juan Ángel San José, Juan López, Julio Falagán, Kerry Roper, Lorenzo Petrantoni, Margaret Kilgallen, Max-o-matic, Morning Breathe, Robert Mars, Robert Rauschenberg, Roy Lichtenstein, Rubén B, Sergio Jiménez, Sr.García, Stephen Faustina, Stephen Powers, Steve Smith, The Fr*, Tom Wasselmann, Thomas Schostok, Todd James, WK Interact...

I'm sure I forgot at least one artist that's important... There are still great classic artists left to study but an infinity to discover.


Thanks Cless!

Pretty Little Thieves - Notpaper

Pretty Little Thieves

A word that comes to mind when describing the work of pretty little thieves is: natural. I don't know what it is, maybe it's the plain shapes, the kraft paper, the trees or the animals. It just is. Naturally, I love it. It's simple and pretty. I think she does more drawing than collage, but I'd like to see more collage!

pretty little thieves
http://prettylittlethieves.com
California

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: Random, collected, raw, and naive thoughts.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: Vintage fabric, felt, book pages, graph and manila paper, construction and found paper especially things with numbers and simple graphics.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: As soon as I could cut and paste, I've already taught my 3 year old niece how to collage.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: Artist.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: No.

Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: A combination of hand drawing, painting and paper cutouts.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: I recently did a piece for an upcoming show made of felt, vintage pattern paper, graph and origami paper with the word "okay" cutout of a paper bag. It's my favorite for today.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: This list is ridiculously long. Okay, a shorter list... Kaoru Kawano, Yoshitomo Nara, Charles and Ray Eames, Paul Rand, Walker Evans, and Lucienne Day.

Thanks pretty little thieves!

Aprile Elcich: New work - Notpaper

Aprile Elcich: New work

I don't usually post my work here, but that probably because it's been so long since I've really done any collages, and I'm really happy that I've had the time lately. It feels really good, and my style has changed a lot from my last collages, and I like it. It's more lovey-dovey, which maybe I am too...

Elo Vazquez - Notpaper

Elo Vazquez

Elo's work is so much fun. She combines headless, happy, and sticky things (as per her description!) to make really enjoyable and feel-good collages. I like that each of her collages brings something different, looks and feels different. She has great work, inspired by online artists, like me, and many of you!

Elo Vazquez
http://www.helloelo.net
Sevilla, Spain

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: Left handed drawing, headless people and animals, happy mountains.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: Foreign notebooks, old Scandinavian magazines, Chinese propaganda, Icelandic newspapers, typewriters, wrapping paper, sticky paper, sticky circles, sticky letters.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: Technichally I started when I was four, I remember reading the word 'c-o-l-l-a-g-e' with a ridicously incorrect spanish accent. But I guess that started a bit more seriously in 2001, when I realized that I had to take away some things out of my brain that were stuck there somehow. It was like a therapy.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: I'm an English philologist (a weird word that comes from Latin that means 'language lover'), and right now I'm taking a master's degree in teaching Spanish. But I've always felt more like a 'image lover'. I also take pictures, I guess I just had to invent a future for me with this language thing.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: I wish I had.

Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: Cut and paste, I love taking away the glue from my fingers when I finish. I also like black pens and felt tip pens.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: I like this one (title image) because it makes me smile. It's a reading mountain, a very happy one, made of pieces taken from a danish architecture magazine that belonged to my boyfriend's father.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: I really enjoy going through my contacts in Flickr and Livejournal, they're my everyday inspiration.

Thanks Elo!

Jorge Restrepo - Notpaper

Jorge Restrepo

I love how Jorge incorporates collage into his graphic design work, using digital and traditional methods. It's funny, that he said he doesn't have any "collage training" because I don't think any of us do. Does it exist? It's like collage is something you cannot teach.

Jorge Restrepo
www.wonksite.com
Bogotá, Colombia

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: My work is a mix of collage and vector graphics with a little of retro look.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: All of them, my photos, from my family, magazines, web resources, textile textures, objects like papers, cables, nylon, etc.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: Really are very faster the process to create it, one or two hours, but previous to design it, I spent my time to development the idea in my mind, it would be around one week or two.


Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: I am a graphic designer graduated with honors from Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: To create collage, not.

Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: I use a background created with ink and masking tape, then I put some images above, eventually I scan the piece and put some vector inside the composition.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: 1970, my self portrait. I created this piece for an exhibition in my city, there I write some episodes of my childhood, and created this collage 100% hand made.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: Andy Warhol, Eduardo Recife, THS, Rauschenberg among others.

Thanks Jorge!

Px(c) - Notpaper

Px(c)

I've always collected instruction manuals, and never known what to really do with them. Once I cut out all the little tools from an ikea manual and used them in a collage. (It took ages). Px(c) knows exactly what to do with the manuals for toaster ovens, tvs, and microwaves that seem--for some reason--too good to throw away. I love his use of kraft paper and white gouache, it works so well with the white background of instruction manuals. And of course, the clever drawings that he adds to his collages really give his work that spark.

Px(c)
http://www.pxcorporation.com/
Contrecoeur, Québec, Canada

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: Papersweets described my style as "sketchyscratchy." I like that.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: I mainly work with instruction booklets, commercial packaging, newspaper images and first aid books. I usually look for bargains in used book stores. This summer, I bought a box full of science magazines from the 60's and the 70's for 2$. Since then, I had much fun surfing the vintage wave. Also, I sometimes use found items, like the religious card on the "st-badminton" collage.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: I always used collage in my sketches, mostly to work on the composition aspect. The result would often be screen printed or reproduced on my paintings. But in 2005, I slowly started to use collage not only in the process but as an art form on its own.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: I sometimes take teaching contracts at a school for visually impaired children. I also screen print t-shirts, posters and cds now and then.


Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: I studied arts at Université du Québec à Montréal (uqam) from 1998 to 2001. Four years during which I was told that my art was not conceptual enough to blend in the art galleries' system.

Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: I like to take images out of their original context and place them together in an absurd or dysfunctional way. On the visual aspect, I sometimes cover the areas between items with white gouache. I have done some pieces with other colors but white remains my favourite. I think its transparency and texture suit my work well. I use this technique a lot in collages but in painting and printing as well.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: That's so hard! My "wrecked car" painting, the "tv memorial" diptych and the appliance catastrophes series are amongst my favourites but it changes regularly.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: Duchamp, Warhol and my collagebox friends.

Thanks Px(c)!

Deambulant - Notpaper

Deambulant

Deambulant's sentimental attachment to her work and all things vintage is admirable. Vintage has definitely become extremely popular, and it's great how anyone can feel sentimental about something not even from their past. And old wedding photos or class pictures found thrift shopping make excellent collages. This explains why vintage ephemera is used so widely in collage culture now.

Deambulant
http://deambulant.deviantart.com/
Portugal

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: Quick, emotional, unpatient--but always very meaningful to me.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: Gramma's old magazines, online magazines or just images I pick up on google and find them interesting. Vintage is a term used to define some artists' collages, which are not actually vintage, sometimes it's 'just' a grunge style mixed with something looking old, even if it's new. But I really like vintage stuff, probably because we are all feeling a bit lost in actual society, so the past comes like something safe to hold on to and a guarantee to be accepted. I find myself 'melting' sometimes when touching or seeing real vintage stuff. Maybe because I associate those things with good lost times. Even if then life wasn't perfect.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: I started doing collages since I was 14 or so, but I did not know that they were called collage works. I just picked up colours and textures and joined them for the final effect. Recycling was the concept that made me do some works for art school at 16, and then I thought that not just boxes could become lamps, but clothes could become pillows, and... papers of different colours a good way to wrap a gift... and then I ended up doing supposed collages.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: Architecture student, last year. But attracted to all forms of art.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: If you consider architecture a school of art then yes, but the reality is that architecture stimulates just a part of our imagination, and has obvious limits. So to take a break from the technical moments, photography, reading, drawing or collage are great.

Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: Er.....I don't think I have any specific ones!


Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: Can't... ugly or beautiful ...they all are very meaningful to me.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: I don't know many, of collage, but I would definitely say MisprintedType is amazing.

Thanks deambulant!

Gordon Magnin - Notpaper

Gordon Magnin

Gordon's work is unique and provocative--biceps, breasts, and permutations of shapes all play into his work. His work is precise and organized, and he considers it something different from collage. Instead of combining different images or pieces, he alters one image with cut out shapes. It's great work, and I've included the less sexy bits here.

Gordon Magnin
www.gordonmagnin.com
(Born, Reno, NV, currently live and work in) Los Angeles, CA

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: Precise, intricate, geometric, destruction.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: Magazines: fashion, bodybuilding, porn, catalogues, I like to work with portraits/faces and pictures of the body.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: I don't really categorize my work as collage. Most of the work I would describe as altered found image, the work isn't created through an additive process as is the case with traditional collage, but through the transformation of a single image.

What first got me thinking about collage was a studio assignment in
grad school; we started a design project through collage eventually leading to the design of a bridge. I really took to the process and technique. I didn't think much of it at the time, but a couple years later I picked up some magazines and started experimenting again.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: I'm currently working for an architect.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: I have a BS in structural engineering and a master's degree from the southern California institute of architecture (SCI_arc). Last fall, I attended the mountain school of arts (MSA^) which is an art school but has no studio component, it consists of lectures and discussion. I would say that I am primarily self taught.


Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: I like to alter a single images by performing precise geometric cuts and operations. Recently I have been thinking of this process as manual computer scripting to modify, destroy and distort these found images.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: Any piece that makes me laugh.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: Marcel Duchamp, Tom Friedman, Damien Hirst, Nick Van Woert, Francis Bacon, Wangechi Mutu, Mathew Barney, Chris Burden, Tom Sachs, Porous Walker, Gordon Matta Clark, Le Corbusier, Coop Himmelb(l)au, Eric Owen Moss, Bruce Nauman, Amie Dicke, Paul Mccarthy, Barry McGee, Carlos Scarpa, Frank Lloyd Wright, Tim Hawkinson, Louis Kahn.

Thanks Gordon!

The Dark - Notpaper

The Dark

I took this photo a couple of weekends ago near an art gallery in Toronto (Ossington + Queen area). I was just wowed by it, and wondered what it was, why it was there, and if it was a gallery sponsored thing. But today, catching up on my rss feeds, I found a little post about it on Computerlove. Apparently the collage-y graffiti is done by Vancouver-based street artist "The Dark" who was in Toronto for an event in mid-August. See more pictures of the process here.



Falling Ruin - Notpaper

Falling Ruin

It's hard to analyze any collaboration without first looking at each artist's work seperately. By doing this you can find out what went into the work! Yann's graphic eye and Eva's beautiful eccentric touches reflect each of their own work, and come together to make something completely different. It really is a gorgeous collaboration.

YR for Yann and EH for Eva.

Names (Real or Screename): Yann Robardey & Eva Eun-Sil Han
URL (Blog, Website): www.flickr.com/photos/falling_ruin
Location (Where are you from?): Stockholm and Brussels (respectively)

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
YR: Meeting at the crossroad of two dreamscapes.
EH: A dynamic conceptual exchange.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
YR: Vintage papers from books and magazines mostly, rather uncoated paper, acrylic paint, rubberstamps sometimes, no computer work. EH: Definitely NO computer works involved. More like working with vintage images from magazines, gesso, pencil and scissors and glue!

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
YR: I've been doing collages more regulary for about 10 years. I can't remember how it started... Was it on postcards while travelling? EH: I've been doing collages for 2 years, before, I did more paintings, drawings but when I met Max Ernst collage works, it changed everything.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
YR: I work as an illustrator, schoolbooks for swedish children--but not with collages: drawings only.
EH: I used to work as a graphic designer for 5 years but now I'm working fully as an artist.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
YR: I went to two art schools, in Epinal and Nantes-France = 5 years.
EH: Four years B.F.A of Spanish literature and Art History, two years Design Institute Graphic Art in Seoul, Korea--one year L'Atelier d'Art de la Grange des Champs--Belgium.


Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
YR: Paper, scissors and glue. You cut one thing and finaly glue another one, it's always surprising, otherwise it gets boring!
EH: Mainly cut and glue but sometimes, I like to use mixed media, like gesso, pencil and gouache.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
YR: The simpliest the best (which I don't do often).
EH: Geometric lines with collage.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
YR: Roman Cieslewicz , Kurt Schwitters, Alexander Rodchenko and some really talented people showing their creations on flickr, like exo, cless and falling apart!
EH: Max Ernst, László Moholy-Nagy, Joseph Cornell, Hannah Hoch, Giorgio de Chirico and many talented artists on flickr, like hibiki, liz , exo, mia.in.the.sky and of course ruin_tourist! He rocks ;o)

Thanks Yann and Eva!

Rachel T Robertson - Notpaper

Rachel T Robertson

Rachel describes her own work perfectly, I almost don't have to! This shows how much she really knows herself and her work, and I admire that. My mind probably changes every week. The one thing that really fascinated me about her work, other than the soft, natural feeling, was that she uses a grid in most of her pieces. Whether it's visible or not, it's there, and it stands out from a lot of collages which can sometimes be hectic and devoid of structure. I would add "soothing" to her list of words.

Rachel T. Robertson
www.racheltrobertson.com, www.racheltrobertson.etsy.com
San Francisco, CA (born in Wisconsin)

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: Quiet, botanical, detailed, layered and stitched.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: I like to work with papers of all kinds: printmaking, tracing, marbled, painted, gridded, lined and printed. I also like to incorporate found papers/ephemera (old envelopes, postcards, book plates) as well as postage stamps. Photos sometimes. Needle and thread always. I have also been known to chop up some of my old artwork into pieces that I reuse in new work.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: I've been making collages since college. It actually started in a Sculpture class. I made some 3-D pieces that were very collage-like and something sort of clicked in my head. Assembling various elements together into one piece made lots of sense to me and seemed like second nature. I started doing that with my 2-D work and I haven't stopped since.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: I have a full-time job as a retail display designer.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: I have a B.S. in Art from University of Wisconsin-Madison.


Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: I like layering transparent/semi-transparent papers with my own drawings and found papers. I am obsessed with stitching things together either by hand or with a sewing machine.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: One piece that I really like is very simple. It's 8.5" x 11" and consists mainly of 1) a background made from a fragment of an old black and white etching I did in school with subtle botanical pencil drawings, 2) a small rectangle of cantaloupe orange painted paper covered with an outline of a maple tree sprout done on tracing paper in ink 3) a postage stamp with a butterfly 4) a long thin strip of orange paper running down the left hand border half obscured by a piece of semi-transparent rice paper 5) tiny hand stiches done with off-white thread scattered across the piece.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: I like so many that it is difficult to list them all. Among the artists/designers I admire, in no particular order: Robert Rauschenberg, David Hockney, Robin & Lucienne Day, Lotta Jansdotter, Thomas Campbell, Joseph Cornell, Charles & Ray Eames, Hans Wegner, Alexander Girard, Richard Diebenkorn, Isamu Noguchi, Hella Jongerius, Phoebe Washburn just to name a few.

Thanks Rachel!

Paperfont - Notpaper

Paperfont

I love this magazine-y font. Not collage, obviously, but magazines make me weak in the knees. You can download the font here. (Thanks, Max!)

I'm trying to post things as I find them now, instead of hoarding them in my bookmarks and then getting overwhelmed. This is good news!

How-To: Image Transfers - Notpaper

How-To: Image Transfers

Left curious after Hollis Brown Thornton's interview on Sunday? I thought that his technique could be really useful to collagists, and I know there are many that do image transfers. I've always wondered what it was, and how to do it. You too? Great, because here is a little step-by-step tutorial!

Woefoep - Notpaper

Woefoep

Woefoep's work seems antique and fragile, and I like that in collage. He uses a lot of subtle typographic elements, such as letters and numbers, which make the old elements used look modern. His assemblages are cool too, and some of his collages resemble them--a little like a 3D collage.

Woefoep
http://woefoep.deviantart.com/
The Netherlands

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: Just "Merzing" around.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: I like old stuff I find on the ground. (Yes, I pick things up, but I always wash my hands). For my assemblages I use everything I find interesting like dead bugs, little pieces of paper, seed pods, screws and bolts, wire, wood, all kinds of things that had a life before and that are not too big. I like small things. For my collages I use old stuff like postcards, newspapers, clear tape, book covers, fabric, stamps, etc. I search a lot on the internet for old pictures which I use in my digital collages. Sometimes I scan my own stuff.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: I've been making assemblages for about ten years now. It all started when I was in school getting interested in 3d illustrations. Making collages was a natural path and the combination of the two was soon discovered.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: I try to be an artist in everything I do. Merzing, parenting, cooking, living...

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: Yes, I do. I graduated from the "Willem the Kooning" academy in Rotterdam where I studied Illustration. I specialised in 3d-illustration.

Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: A combination of assemblage and collage. K. Schwitters used a term called Merz. Merz means: making connections, between all things on earth.


Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: It's a big panel hanging in my living room, I made it ten years ago, using all kind of techniques. It's part collage, part assemblage, part painting, part kinetic. The panel contains moving arms, swinging legs, lights, flipping panels, boxes, collages, paintings and other stuff. A lot of items came from my family, those items have special value.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: I love the old stuff like: Kurt Schwitters, Robert Rauschenberg, Ben Nicholson, Raoul Hausmann, El Lissitzky, Max Ernst, Hans Arp, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, Hannah Hoch, Thijs Rinsema, Lajos Kassak, Conray Maddox, Joseph Cornell, Peter Blake and others. I would also like to use this opportunity to thank the lovely and talented people of Deviantart and Flickr, you have all been a great inspiration, Thanks!

Thanks Woefoep!

Paper Cuts - Notpaper

Paper Cuts

Paper cuts is a group show opening at Little Bird Gallery in LA this weekend. What really caught my eye was the graphic—nobody knows paper cuts like we do, right? I thought it might include more collage artists than it does, but it does at least include one, Will Bryant. He's a student who has been guest blogging for poppytalk, and his work is pretty great. I've included some images below.

Hollis Brown Thornton - Notpaper

Hollis Brown Thornton

Hollis' work is fantastic. I was so curious and so in awe when I first saw his work, which really isn't collage at all, but image transferring. But since it struck a chord with me, I know it will strike a chord with you!

Hollis Brown Thornton (it's my real name)
www.hollisbrownthornton.com, www.flickr.com/photos/hollisbrownthornton/
South Carolina

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: 2D acrylic and pigment transfer.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: A lot of my past work has used old family photographs, which I combine with scanned drawings in Photoshop. Recently, I've been creating installations and photographing these scenarios. I like to combine old, outdated electronics with devices I use on a daily basis.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: My work is not technically collage because I use the computer, really to escape a lot of the limitations I had with collage (such as the desire to combine delicate drawing with photographs). But the idea of collage, it is very much what I do, the combination of distant, diverse elements closely resembles what we currently experience in our day to day. I think it is why many young artists do collage. Plus, collage has energy. It is the punk rock of the art world.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: Just an artist now. In the past, I've done web design and worked at galleries. I continue to install for a gallery, but it is only once a month.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: I studied art at the University of South Carolina.


Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: The transfer process is my most obvious technique. It allows me to attach a photographic image to any surface that will take acrylic paint. I also scrub the surface of my paintings with sanding pads, combined with water, it looks very natural, like old eroded walls. When I draw with markers, I often draw on the opposite side of the paper, and let the ink bleed through. Or tape drawings I'm working on to a piece of computer paper and printing on them with an ink jet.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: Mine? I have no idea... I did one piece where I overlapped a photo of me and my dad on the beach with an aerial photo of elephants walking. It basically looks like little me playing with the miniature elephants. From another artist? Hmmmm... the Wesselmann kitchen assemblage collage pieces are some of my favorites.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: Famous or established: Twombly, Barney, Miranda July, David Gordon Green, Rothenberg, Basquiat, Kerry James Marshall, Peter Doig, Hirst, Nicolas Roeg, Kubrick, Johns, Rauschenberg, New York School Abstract Expressionists, Schnabel, Mark Bradford, Warhol, Wesselmann, Kevin Zucker, Hilary Harkness, Ian Davis.

Thanks Hollis!

designedmemory - Notpaper

designedmemory


I keep hearing about designedmemory everywhere, and I am in love with their collage inspired websites. They really have a unique approach that makes them stand tall above so many other web design firms. The movement and digital imagery is just to die for.

Click on the images to visit the site (I suggest you do to really get the full effect).






Claudio Parentela - Notpaper

Claudio Parentela

Claudio makes some weird and crazy collages, and I really admire his originality. I've been thinking a lot about originality lately, it's had me at a standstill when I try to create my own collages. I've seen so much work, and there are so many styles and techniques I love, and I think because of this, I fear becoming a copycat. When I think so deeply into things like this, it's when I tell myself to: stop thinking! And just create.

Claudio Parentela
www.claudioparentela.net, http://theextrafinger.blogspot.com (1 of my 10 art blogs)
Italy

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: Crazy & funny & coloured & creepy & fashionable with dirty alcoholic taste experiments...

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: I follow my instincts and mutable moods... I like to experiment and to create with whatever I've got under my hands at the moment. Yes, I like to work with magazines, photographs, vintage, etc.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: I've been making collages for some time--4 or 5 years I think. I was bored of drawing only in black and white and using only rivers of black indian ink. I loved it very much, but it was time to pass on to other mediums. I adore making collages with many different materials, always mixing them in new ways...

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: I'm a professional artist and I'm a freelance journalist too.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: No, I'm a self-taught, very anarchic and individualistic artist. Totally self produced, day after day.


Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: Well at the moment I'm in total love with collage. I really like picking up all the things I like and I see and I find... Some things usually so unusuable and incompatible between themselves and I love to mix them, to cut them, to glue them, to draw and paint on them. I'm using all that I find as support (base). I have a big collection of old papers and plastics to use as the foundation. I use them to draw on with water-colours, paints, ink, coloured markers, etc.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: ...I have no particular piece that I like... I like all my artworks (it's the truth...!)

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: Too many to list... Two who are very much a continuing source of insipration for me and my art are J.P. Witkin and Diamanda Galas.

Thanks Claudio!

New: Links Section - Notpaper

New: Links Section

Check out the links page (getting larger quickly) that lists artists, blogs, and groups featured on Notpaper. Still needs a little tweaking, though.

(Let me know if I forgot your link)

Nylon: Par Avion - Notpaper

Nylon: Par Avion

I'm going to let you in on a little secret: I love everything about magazines. Okay, so that's not much of a secret at all, but it does explain what I am showing you today. I collect old and new magazines of all kinds, sometimes I read them, sometimes I just use them in my collages.


One thing I've noticed about one of my favourites, Nylon, is that most of the fan mail they get is shockingly relevant. Readers use the magazine to create collages, send them in, and each issue Nylon shows some of those collages in their "Par Avion" section. Some of them are really great considering that the creators are not professional artists or designers.

Rebecca Trawick - Notpaper

Rebecca Trawick

Rebecca's collage are like vintage scrapbooking meets design. At first glance, they may appear to be pretty typical of that "scrapbook" style, but they definitely have a well-designed edge to them. Fittingly, her vintagey work is featured in Uppercase gallery's Old School (show and book).

Rebecca Trawick, Bluebird Studios
www.bluebirdstudios.com
California

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: Vintage inspired cut + paste, sometimes with a naughty edge.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: Vintage paper ephemera is my favorite--from handwritten letters, recipes and found materials to old book pages, illustrations and covers. Also vintage magazines, photos, wallpapers, and type. I also love repro papers from Paper Source and other sources.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: I've been creating for about 10 years--as a college student studying studio arts (painting and drawing concentration) who didn't have a studio, creating small portable works at the kitchen table was key. I quickly realized I liked this small, intense approach. It definitely came out of my sketchbook style as well--I've always treated them more like a place to store snippets, inspiration, colour and texture.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: In addition to being an artist and mother, I work at a small contemporary art museum in Southern CA (Wignall Museum) where I act as director and curator.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: I received my undergrad degree in Studio Arts (painting/drawing) in 1998.


Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: I'm pretty basic, I must admit--uhu sticks are a must, a good pair of scissors, a blade and a cutting mat. That's really all I need! Lately I've been experimenting with removing layers or weathering layers, though and I'm having a lot of fun with that.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: I don't have one favorite piece really; I feel like I'm always getting better at my craft, so sometimes it's hard to look at old work though!

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: Oh so many... Collage artists include: Paul Butler, Eduardo Recife, David Wallace, Pat Streeter, Claudine Hellmuth, Pepe Mar, Lance Letscher, Mary Emma Hawthorne, Charles Wilkin, Michelle Caplan and many, many others!!!

Thanks Rebecca!

collage this, by fred free - Notpaper

collage this, by fred free

"Collage This" by Fred Free
Altered book, 52 pages, 6x8 inches.
1/13/06-1/31/06

...A few years back I bought a book called "collage" from a book sale at my local library. It was a how-to-do-it book you might give your mother if she wanted to learn how to make collages...

In the new altered books series (starts today!), I'm going to mostly let the books speak for themselves. I was thinking I was going to ask the artist questions about the book, but you know what? I am going to leave every book open to interpretation. When there is a whole collection of works that has one cohesive message or theme, they tell a story or evoke a feeling. That's why collage books are so great—seeing everything in one place is so much more impressive than a single piece on its own.

So about the books: I hope to feature all kinds of gluebooks, mini-books, altered books, collage books, art journals... Whatever you would like to call them, they will be here. I'll give you a little bit of information about the book, such as the title, who made it, how large it is and any special qualities it has. Maybe I will describe certain experiments or techniques used. But that's it, you can read the books on your own.

As you can tell I am super excited about this particular feature.

PS. Look forward to tomorrow's interview with Rebecca Trawick.

Chad Kouri - Notpaper

Chad Kouri

Make sure you take the time to read this slightly witty interview with Chad, I particularly enjoyed it. He says he loves hand lettering and typography, and I would love to see more hand lettering in his collage work, because hand lettering and anything handmade has really made a comeback, hasn't it?

Chad Kouri (ichat: kouridesign)
www.longliveanalog.com, www.thepostfamily.com
Chicago, IL (City of the Big Shoulders)

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: The things that dreams are made of... well, my dreams.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: I really enjoy pulling images from vintage craft books. Like old knitting instruction manuals and such. The models in those books are amazingly hilarious. I also like old home decor books, anything with gaudy patterns, and kids books... especially the ones with the cardboard pages. Those rule.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: I have been doing collages casually for years. The thing that really made me develop a style and come to terms with it as an art form and not just something I did for myself was a color theory teacher I had in college. He pushed everyone in the class to explore color and composition in whatever medium we wanted. Once he saw my collage stuff he loved it. He made me start thinking about it as finished pieces rather than random explorations. Before then most of my teachers didn't consider it an art and that really pissed me off. I really wanted to prove them wrong but didn't really know how to. So that was a huge influence as well. I think people telling me I can't do something helps more than someone being totally supportive. I know... it's weird.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: I just quit my 9-5 (hooray!!!!) as a graphic designer for a marketing company here in Chicago. I worked there on and off for 3 years and really learned a lot but it just wasn't for me. I still do a lot of freelance design work but I have been trying to push my illustration and collage work a lot more these days. I just enjoy it so much more. But graphic design and art direction projects pay the bills. As long as the project involves some form of creation I am all for it.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: I moved to Chicago to go to art school for graphic design but didn't finish. The best training I get is from friends. I am extremely lucky to have some of the most talented people in the world around me at all times. I wouldn't trade it for anything... except maybe an endless supply of PEZ candy or like laser vision or something. That would rule.

Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: I keep most images I use intact. Just cuttin and pastin. I do like taking old pages from novels and blocking out most of the words so it reads completely differently. I don't use that extremely often in my work but it is fun. I also realllllly love hand lettering and typography. Good times.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: Okay... so it's one of the first pieces I did that was conceived and approached as a finished piece of art in the collage style. The canvas is an old golden rod colored envelope that I dripped coffee on to give it some texture. Then glued a piece of old wallpaper to the top that was cut out into a really graphic cloud shape. I stuck a few guitars out of the cloud so it looked like it was raining guitars and put a pinup girl form an old Camel Cigarette ad at the bottom. Till this day it is the piece that I get the most offers for but I have a really hard time letting it go. I don't think I ever will.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: As far as collage artists go, I really like Eduardo Recife, Mario Wagner and Jakob Printzlau to name a few. I have really gotten into found object installation stuff somewhat recently like Cody Hudson, Juan Chavez, and Ian Pedigo. As far as painters go, some of my favs at the moment are Maya Hayuk, Nick Butcher, and Ky Anderson. Illustrators... Luke Ramsey, Andy Rementer, Steven Harrington... I could go on forever.

Thanks Chad!


Oscar Gee - Notpaper

Oscar Gee

Oscar's collages are aesthetically pleasing and pretty, which for some reason is what he doesn't like about his work! His minimal use of grunge and strong colour make his art what it is. I can understand his complaint though, that nobody should create art without meaning. I hope that art school will show him how the "art-as-idea" theme can be put into use.

Oscar
http://pierrots-frown.deviantart.com/
South West, UK

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: Past work: kitsch and meaningless. Future work: concept over style.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: Stuff with history, the stuff of the everyday, stuff that connects us socially, stuff that connects art to life.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: About two years and I started by collecting a bunch of stuff that I wanted in one place and I tried deliberately to make them aesthetically pleasing. But now I realise with experience that that's absurd, boring and pointless. I now want to try and find a balance between art-as-art and art-as-idea, and whether that'll be entirely through collage... who knows.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: I'm a good-for-nothing student.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: No, but I start art college in September.


Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: I haven't made any collage for so long I can't remember..! But hopefully i'll rediscover them again soon.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: Truthfully, I don't like many of my collages. In retrospect, I did like a little booklet I did with bunch of pictures of items from a tacky catalogue... but it was too damn pretty!

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: Sol LeWitt, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg.

Thanks Oscar! (Sorry for my lateness)

Poolga Wallpapers - Notpaper

Poolga Wallpapers

I just found out about this neat site yesterday on FlickrPoolga is an iPhone wallpaper site with contributions from various artists. I'm writing about this today because I'm lazy. No! It's because I'm busy... It's got some great art from collage artists like Emmanuel Polanco (in photo), Christopher Bettig, and Max-o-matic.

Eduardo Recife - Notpaper

Eduardo Recife

I am sure most of you know about Eduardo Recife and MisprintedType, and if you don't, you haven't been reading lately! That's why I am actually going to cover Eduardo's design and illustration work, because it's new to me and it's a fantastic example of the many ways collage can be used in design. I've actually made a point to do that this year at school--try to use collage in any way I can. I hope Eduardo never stops doing his personal work, because it's quite inspirational to a lot of us!

Eduardo Recife
http://www.misprintedtype.com, www.eduardorecife.com
Brazil

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: It's thoughts on paper.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: I work with all kinds of resources. I've been collecting things for the past 10 years--old magazines, books, found stuff, photos, ephemera... I have a cabinet filled with them.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: I have had MisprintedType online for exactly 10 years now... So, I must say that I've been working with collage for around 11 or 12 years. Not exactly sure when I started. But one thing led to the other, I discovered the grunge type on the internet, and all sorts of typographic manipulations, and I fell in love with it. So, usually they used to come with collage works, and so I started to play with type and collage in a very experimental way.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: I work mostly as an illustrator these days. But I also enjoy keeping my personal works going; working on collages, drawings and photographs.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: I graduated in graphic design here in Brazil. But I must say that I am self taught, since I had my personal style developed way before I entered graphic design school.

Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: I truly love handmade collage. Working with scissors, glue and all sorts of papers and other materials. It gives a depth that its very different from just digital collage. I must say that I also really enjoy to work with pencil. I am addicted to it...

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: I have no favorites really, but usually I enjoy my latest piece of work.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: So many...

Thanks Eduardo!

Back to School - Notpaper

Back to School

So, I went back to school today, and it was a nice fresh start because a new building was built for the school of design. I would just like to update you, that I'm not sure how my blogging will be affected. It will either be regular or even more frequent because I'm sitting at a computer all day (most likely), or it will be a little less frequent because I'm not slacking off. So if the second is true, I might need a little help from a guest blogger or another writer. Let me know if this interests you at all!

I will see you soon, with more interviews. Look forward to one with Eduardo Recife...

Maletti Gianfranco - Notpaper

Maletti Gianfranco

Maletti Gianfranco's collages are mod experiments with shape and texture. He loves using tissue paper because of it's versatility with colour, and his work benefits from this technique. Maletti has been making collages for an astounding 20 years! I think collage is difficult to get bored with, it's so different all the time and there are always new techniques and new inspiration popping up. I hope to have the same dedication!

Maletti Gianfranco
malettigianfranco.blogspot.com, www.malettigianfranco.it
Italy

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: I play with pieces of torn paper and I paste them on a thin cardboard like children do.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: I started using cut and torn coloured cardboards, and later I began using tissue paper. Sometimes I try to use images from magazines. I would like to use magazine images with tissue paper. I've made some proofs but I didn't like them even if other people like them.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: I started making collages twenty years ago. I was bored of photography.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: When I was working it was a hobby--now I'm retired and it is a passion.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: I never attended an art school. I mixed with people who love art and were able to take critics and self-criticism.


Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: My favourite technique is using tissue paper with a liquid glue (it's name in Italian is Vinavil). Tissue paper has transparent colours and when it is wet its colours expand and mix in a nice way.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: The collage A (2007 004) because I've been able to expand on 100x100 cm what I've made on little surfaces (20x20 cm) then collage B (2007 013) which is a proof with tissue paper and images from magazines.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: I like Matisse very much, he started working with collages when he was old and he used to colour paper. I also admire Alberto Burri for colours and shapes of his works.

Thanks Maletti!

Notpaper is a blog dedicated to showcasing the work of international collage artists. We strive to meet the artists and understand the thoughts behind the process, so interviews with artists are a big part of what we do. If you are new to the site, please enjoy our archives featuring hundreds of collagists!   more 

Contact

Sorry, artwork submissions are temporarily closed.

For any other non submission related inquiries, please email:
info@notpaper.net

Archives

Categories

Upcoming Events

  • Paper Cuts
    Paper cuts is a group show opening at Little Bird Gallery in LA this weekend. What really caught my eye was the graphic—nobody knows paper cuts like we do, right? I thought it might include more collage artists than it does, but it does at least include one, Will Bryant. He's a student that's been guest blogging for poppytalk, and his work is pretty great. I've included some images below.
  •  more 

Recent Tweets