November 2008 Archives

Andrei Cojocaru - Notpaper

Andrei Cojocaru

Yes, the above image is a little freaky, but I really like the work of Andrei. His magazine collages are colourful and creative, and I hope he continues to explore this medium. But I'm biased, I think everyone should explore the collage medium, if not at least once in their lives!

Andrei Cojocaru
http://andrei75.deviantart.com
Paris, France (but born in Bucharest, Romania)

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: A rather random mix of shapes, colours, letters and numbers.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: I like to work with just about anything that I think will look good when put next to another thing!:) Seriously, I work with magazine cutouts (both new and vintage), clothing labels, supermarket receipts, pieces of old posters I find on the street or in the subway, transfers... and I also like to add, from time to time, some handwriting or some doodles, so I also use pens, markers, watercolours.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: I've been really doing it for about six months, but I've been admiring this art for about two years, and started thinking about doing collages myself about a year ago. What made me start? I don't really know... I just felt attracted to this form of art and all of the sudden, my hands started cutting stuff and putting that stuff together in another configuration, until my eyes were pleased with the result...

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: I'd say that "artist" is the last thing I am! I am a full time student, I study Law... totally unrelated to art! But that doesn't keep me from doing collages and some graphic design.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: Absolutely none! I was a graffiti writer for a few years, though, that is my only "art training."


Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: I just put some stuff in front of me (magazine cutouts, photos, etc) and start combining them, putting them one on top of the other, next to the other, I'll put some other pieces if I feel it will look good, might get bored of an element and take it out, and so on an so forth until I am happy with what I have in front of me! It's only at that moment that I glue the stuff together! Sometimes I like to put a lot of colours together, make something flashy and eye-catching, some other times I just like to keep it minimal... Depends on my mood.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: It's hard to say! Not because I have so many pieces I like, but because I don't really like any of them! It may sound weird, but I quickly become unsatisfied with my work, maybe because I am new to this field and I'm still evolving, still exploring the world of collages. But I think that getting bored of my own work is a good thing, because it keeps me going, it makes me want to try new things, etc.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: Thomas Schostok/{ths}, Eduardo Recife/misprinted type, Augusto Giovanetti/prrr!, Liz Cohn, Fred Free, Kareem Rizk, Alex Hamrick and many, many more! I found a lot of the artist i admire on deviantart.

Thanks Andrei!

Notpaper, I miss you! - Notpaper

Notpaper, I miss you!

It's so busy here in Toronto (and in my life), and I know everyone else is also insanely busy right now. With work and school and the holidays, etc, etc, etc... I certainly miss blogging every day. I have three weeks of school left (ahh!)—so I will keep posting here and there as I have time—and I'm excited to blog regularly again!

See you soon!
Aprile

PS. I'll still be updating this, the Seen & Heard feed where I share what I find on the blogs I read.

Jacob Whibley - Notpaper

Jacob Whibley



Jacob Robert Whibley
www.jacobwhibley.com
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.

A: Ephemeral, nonobjective, pyrrhic, architectural, subtle, intricate, interstitial, machined, organic, cumulative.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: I've been collecting vintage paper from a variety of sources over the last seven years. I mainly use old shipping forms and office ephemera because I enjoy the colours, textures and derailing the existing printed typographic structures into fragmented and graphic forms; but I also use old books and envelopes.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: After three years of hoarding paper in boxes and suitcases I finally got over my hesitation of not wanting to "ruin" the paper and have actively been assembling for the last four years. As for what made me start it's hard to tell; I knew I didn't want to create magazine based collages. The end results needed to be abstract and unrecognizable forms--meaning and shapes deciphered over time as the body of work grew and the pieces had the ability to relate to each other as a whole.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: I work half and half--creating my art and doing illustration and design work, with the occasional movie prop tossed into the mix.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: Yes, I went to the Ontario College of Art & Design, where I studied illustration and design.


Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: Sometimes I feel my collages get too rigid and linear so I'll use a torn or damaged piece of ephemera so as to offset that. I also find it useful to have a small piece of sandpaper lying around so I can smooth out curves.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: I would have to say it was my first series of cubes. Physically crafting and staining the wood, constructing the forms, making the incisions and creating the collages is hugely gratifying and has opened up many new possibilities in my creative effort.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: there are a ton of local artists who incorporate paper into their work that I admire like Nikki Woolsey, Jennifer Sciarrino, Jeff Garcia, and variety of historical figures, modernist typographers and architects.

Thanks Jacob!

David Mizelle - Notpaper

David Mizelle

David's work has a truly vintage quality. Maybe it's his dediction to handmade creations, or maybe it's the soft orange and brown hues reminiscent of the 70s. I think that's why I chose the subject image I did--an image of a "seventies chic" guy in a tan suit jacket holding a cigar and a duck model. Very cool work.

David Mizelle (or davidson)
http://www.davidmizellejr.com
Richmond, VA (I grew up in Norfolk, VA)

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: Honest.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: I prefer to use vintage magazines and books for my imagery. Time magazine from the 1940's and 50's is really great, as are childrens' books. Every now and then I'll print something out from the web, but not often. Since I don't use Photoshop, web images don't have the texture I need for my pieces. There's just something much more pleasing about using old papers. I also use Letraset transfer letters, pencils, transfer markers, and acrylic paints.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: I started about 5 years ago. I was never good at drawing from life, I couldn't paint formally, but I've always had lots of magazines and books laying around. I was looking for a new outlet of art to try besides my photography.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: I'm currently in school full time, so, no. I've worked just about every job imaginable though, from high rise window cleaner to chef to secretary.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: I'm currently in the Graphic Design program at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond. I graduate the December of next year (hopefully).

Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: I do everything by hand, so I don't use a computer to do anything except to scan in the finished piece. A lot of times I like to distress my images, or even the background the entire piece is on. So for that I use sandpaper. I like to apply paints really horribly and kind of randomly, and then start basing my imagery on that. I don't use paint in every piece, and I haven't for awhile now, but it's something I'll always work with in some fashion. Sometimes when I sit down to do a piece I have no idea what the concept or reason is, so I have tons of folders of cut up images, strips of paper, and trash I've found on the street that I spread out and just go from there. I try to communicate a message, be it social or personal, in every piece.


Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: My favorite personal piece? Probably any of my collages from my "Progress?" series. My favorite piece by someone else is "Canyon" by Rauschenberg.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: Robert Rauschenberg, The Beatles, Jasper Johns, Kurt Schwitters, Eduardo Recife, Wes Anderson, Chuck Scalin, DJ Shadow, Max Ernst, and Pink Floyd are artists who inspire me.

Thanks David!

1000 journals project - Notpaper

1000 journals project

"This is an experiment, and you are part of it."

Last weekend, I went to a screening of 1000 Journals, a documentary by Andrea Kreuzhage. I am so glad I dragged myself out of bed at 11 in the morning on a Saturday to see this film's first Toronto screening at the Moving Image Film Festival (there were only about 8 people there)! I have known about this project for a while, as most of you probably have as well, but for some reason I am so much more intrigued by the project after watching the documentary. A woman who received one of the journals and was featured in the film was present to chat about it, which was an added bonus. And collage artist Julie Sadler (from Collage Clearinghouse) was in the film. Apparently, there were 60 hours (I think) of footage shot for the documentary, which was shaved down to 90 minutes.


The 1000 Journals project was launched in 2000, and is still ongoing. One thousand journals were left in random places or given to people, but as people started to hear about the project, they wanted to get involved. People were dying to get their hands on what seemed like so few journals, and so a website was started to help track the journals. Now, you can view scans of the them, which include writing, drawing, collage, and other things, and check up on their progress. Warning, this website can be very addictive!







The creator, Someguy, finally got enough journals back (about 40) to put them in a show at SFMoma (which runs from November 1, 2008 - April 5, 2009. I wish I lived in San Francisco, and if you do you should definitely go see this.

There is also a beautiful book published (by Chronicle) on the project, which I purchased today.

AND,
There is another project started called 1001 Journals. In this one, users can send out their own journals, so that more and more journals can reach more and more people. I will be starting a journal, which anyone can participate in. My only request is that it be filled with collage! I'll post the link where you can sign up to receive the journal as soon as I can.

Péter Kupás - Notpaper

Péter Kupás

Péter's work is bright and exciting. I love how he uses colour blocking and décollage, and how dissimilar these two techniques usually are. His technique of never being finished editing his collages is familiar with some of us, and I think some of the best collages can become even better with endless tinkering...

Péter Kupás
http://www.flickr.com/photos/happy-nasal-cavities/
Pécs, Hungary

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: Illegal bordercrossing between abstraction and reality, structure and meaning, originality and plagiarism.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: Mostly found images from magazines and books, illustration, and leftovers from my own, or other peoples' work (like stickers, letters, shopping lists I find on the street, stuff I pick up from sidewalks).

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: Since 2001. I was writing poetry back then, and on some pages of my notebook, I glued together random images, and I liked it so much that I started experimenting with it, and created my first piece.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: I'm also a graphic designer and an English teacher.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: No.


Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: Getting out a dozen of images from my collection, arranging and rearranging until it looks good. From this point on, two things can happen. I either decide it doesn't look good anyway, cut it up, and use it somewhere else, or throw away the whole thing; or, add something more to it, rework it. half of my works are in a constant stae of flux, it is a sort of continuous re-evaluation.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: It's a very simple collage: a roughly cut photograph of an albino buck glued to the middle of a white photocopy paper.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: Basquiat for his wildness, Twombly for his calligraphy, Warhol for his ideas, Kippenberger for his attitude. And basically all artist who work with large installations like Jason Rhoades, Jessica Stockholder and Phoebe Wasburn, but this list is by no means complete; I also admire a lot of other people from a lot of other areas of art.

Thanks Peter!

Thomas Schostok - Notpaper

Thomas Schostok

I know a lot of people love the work of Thomas Schostok (aka ths), and there is a reason why. His work is grungy and wonderful, so unplanned that every piece is very unique. I love the way he makes what looks like board books will collages. That is such a genius idea, and if you're doing handmade collages, that would be a great surface.

Thomas Schostok
www.ths.nu (Portfolio), www.cape-arcona.com (Fonts)
Essen, Germany

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: Trash urban warfare porn dirt style pop.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: I developed to work on a PC if it comes to collage and art, now. Some time ago, I entirely worked "analog" without a computer. I usually get the material for the collage from things I found. I'm not very fixed about that.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: I think I started creating collages 10 years ago. I worked for too long on a computer creating designs and such and searched for a way to get me away from a PC. So I got some sketchbooks and started to glue.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: Primary, I'm a graphic designer.


Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: No.

Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: Start to work without thinking about the artwork.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: For me, my favourite pieces are always that kind of artworks that were produced in a very short time. Maybe under some sort of deadline or such. Those things are the best. At the end I'm always surprised about the results.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: Cuminthestreets.com

Thanks Thomas!

Bryanna Millis - Notpaper

Bryanna Millis

Bryanna's work is great, her work is different because she doesn't use magazines or other common materials. She prints out her images, which I think gives them the edgy "90s" zine quality that her work resembles to me. I don't know why, exactly--I think the graininess from the prints adds this bit of edge.

Bryanna Millis
www.bryannamillis.com, www.goingtogreatlengths.blogspot.com
(I've lived in several North Eastern cities and am now in) Washington, DC

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: Telling stories with layered landscapes

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: I used to use a lot of magazine cuttings but after I got a color printer I started altering and using photographs--mostly my own--printed on a variety of papers. I also use a lot of translucent/transparent papers to add layers without obscuring what lies beneath them.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: I grew up in a house where we always made art, but I really started to discover my own voice in collage about 10 years ago. I kept finding that whenever I painted or drew anything I really wanted to cut it up, rearrange it, and add outside images/textures/colors. Then, while in graduate school in 2002, I started a series to illustrate some poems that I'd written and eventually left the poems by the wayside and focused on making collages.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: I worked as a graphic designer for several years before making the transition to economics. Now I work in international economic development, which involves a lot of travel to places as diverse as Cambodia, Nigeria, and the West Bank. This has had a huge impact on the themes in my work.


Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: I studied art all through school and earned a minor in Fine Arts in college.

Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: Lately I'm really liking sewing into my pieces. I like the tactile nature of it and the way it enables me to add a delicate line, which can be hard to do in a thickly layered piece. I also use it for the different kinds of meanings it brings, from domesticity to attachment. I've been scanning the backs of collages I've sewn into, or scanning the left over cut threads, and using those patterns in new pieces as well.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: I like a lot of different pieces for very different reasons. However, I recently revisited a strategy I used in "Hillside, Galway", a piece I've always loved, and wound up with something totally different in "The Long Road". "The Long Road" really represents the way I'm working right now.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: This year I keep coming back to Marlene Dumas, Jose Bedia, the drawings of Christo and Jean Claude, and Richard Diebenkorn.

Thanks Bryanna!

Collage Groups - Notpaper

Collage Groups

I have created a few groups (which could hopefully become "collage communities") in the name of "Notpaper" so that we can communicate easier. Anyone can join either group, and can post information and artwork freely. I may use content from the groups on the blog, so if there's anything you want to show me, you can do it there. (You can still email me as well).

Flickr Group: http://www.flickr.com/groups/notpaper/
Facebook Group: http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=47397300545

Philip Harrell - Notpaper

Philip Harrell

Philip's collages seem so uncalculated and effortless, the combination of so many different materials and techniques is just stunning. You should also check out his work using old photographs and polaroids--it reminds me a lot of the "experimental film" book by Nick Tassone featured a little while ago.

Philip Harrell (aka no-thanks)
http://www.alightedlamp.com/
Dallas, Texas

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: Quick, messy, spontaneous, ambiguous collections of seemingly interesting parts.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: I have this box that's been collecting left over scraps from mixed media works, or just stuff that was sitting on my desk or was in my pocket. This includes brochures, newspapers, magazine clippings, photographs, playing cards, shoe laces, paper clips, and other various paper products that I don't feel like throwing away. Pretty much anything that would be considered trash I try to use in some way first. I destroyed MICA's little catalog and used the parts of it in numerous collages. Tape is also one of my most favorite things to work with and is probably the most important element in my collages.

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: I made my first one about two years ago. I had been really enjoying the collages by my friend Alex Hamrick and decided one day I'd like to try collage and see what would happen. It wasn't until about a year later that I discovered clear plastic tape and found a process that I really enjoyed though.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: I'm also a full time student. Really, I'm more a student than anything else.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: I've got a little over two years of college art training.


Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: Dig through box, hopefully find something interesting, modify if necessary, cut piece of clear tape, adhere to paper. Then repeat these steps until it all adds up to something I like. Lately though, I've been having a lot of fun ripping up polaroids and combining them with disposable camera pictures that we wouldn't print for people at a photo lab I used to work at. There was just something interesting about the pictures we would pass that I think works well with modified polaroids.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: I honestly cannot say I have a favourite piece. Most of my work I complete in sketchbooks because, aside from the fact that I've always worked that way, I really enjoy viewing the progress from the beginning to the end. It's also really amazing to me that I can make such ambiguous work but look back and be reminded of the process which then reminds me of why the process came about. I think that's more important than anything else, so my collection of filled sketchbooks is my favorite piece.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: I've been using deviantArt more lately and there are so many great artists on that website. I'm always finding someone to admire so I won't make a list here. Out in the real world though, I don't know too many artists, but Alex Hamrick's work is really inspiring to me as well as my sisters' work. Also their dedication. That's inspiring too. Other than that I don't really follow the art world.

Thanks Philip!

Mandi Johnson - Notpaper

Mandi Johnson

I love Mandi's collages, and I wish there were more! What I like is the colours she uses--natural browns and beautiful turquoise. She started out just scrapbooking, but any cut and paste technique can easily become collage.

Amanda (Mandi) Johnson
candimandi.typepad.com
North Canton, Ohio

Q: Describe your work in 10 words or less.
A: An eclectic mix of scrapbooking and art journaling.

Q: What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!
A: I like to make mini journals with clippings from vintage magazines, but when I can't get my hands on the old stuff, I like to cut out graphic patterns, interesting typography, and evocative photographs from modern magazines. I also like to use my own photography and found objects. (I participate in a blog called theartisfound.blogspot.com).

Q: How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?
A: I started scrapbooking five years ago, but the hobby recently turned into more art journaling that scrapbooking.

Q: Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?
A: I am an interior design student and have taken a few graphic design classes as a part of my program requirements.

Q: Do you have any formal art training?
A: My brother is a graphic designer, and we hash our design ideas at times. But the only formal training I have had is a couple of graphic design classes at the Meyers School of Art at the University of Akron.


Q: Explain your favourite techniques.
A: I like using typography as a textural part of my work--stenciling or stamping with thick, gooey, acrylic paints. I also really dig layering different kinds of typography, like scribbled hand writing as a background to a more strctured font like Helvetica.

Q: Describe your favourite piece ever created.
A: I think my favorite thing I've made is a journal for an artsy friend of mine. I stained plywood and layered tinted plaster that I stamped into for the cover which I duct taped together. The inside is a mix ox vintage clippings, painting, paper piecing, and stitching.

Q: What other artists do you admire?
A: I love the art journaling of people such as Dina Wakley, Debee Campos, and Kara Haupt.

Thanks Mandi!

Notpaper is a blog dedicated to showcasing the work of international collage artists. We strive to meet the artists and understand the thoughts behind the process, so interviews with artists are a big part of what we do. If you are new to the site, please enjoy our archives featuring hundreds of collagists!   more 

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