February 2011 Archives

The Dolomite Collages by Matthew Walkerdine - Notpaper

The Dolomite Collages by Matthew Walkerdine

A series of collages and drawings based on the Dolomite mountain range that went on to become the UNFOCUSSED EYES installation.

via Matthew Walkerdine.

New Work: Jorge Chamorro - Notpaper

New Work: Jorge Chamorro

Check out these new collages by Jorge Chamorro (I interviewed him in 2009, read it here).

See more at his website.

Pencil Drawing by Sam Winston - Notpaper

Pencil Drawing by Sam Winston

Love this "pencil drawing" by Sam Winston. So clever!

Haute Helping Hands by Clarke Curtis - Notpaper

Haute Helping Hands by Clarke Curtis

I love these collage creatures by Clarke Curtis, there is something really interesting to them. They feel like they could be illustrations--definitely his own unique style.

(thanks Maria for pointing out his work!)

Claudio Montagna - Notpaper

Claudio Montagna

The style of Claudio's collages reminds me of things I have seen before, but really are nothing like things I've seen before. They are a combination of abstract art and rough textural collages, but his pieces have a fleshy undertone--based on the nature of his sources. Whether you like it or not, his works seem to live and breathe, and feel almost lifelike for some reason.


Claudio Montagna
www.claudiomontagna.com.br
Rio de Janeiro, Brasil


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Collage of photos from erotic magazines with interference of painting.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

Basically photos of human bodies from erotic magazines.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I've been making collages for 8 years and I started because I wanted to create a hybrid form of art between photo and painting.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I run a small business.

Do you have any formal art training?

I have studied at the Parque Lage Visual Arts School at Rio de Janeiro since 2001.

Explain your favourite techniques.

I use collage of erotic photos on canvas in which I interfere with acrylic painting. These images seek, simultaneously, direct and tactile contact and demand strategic perspective. The work aims to articulate sculptoric meaning (the photographic illusion) and painting (the bi-dimensional evidence).

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

The series Liquid Life. I sold a work of 200 x 300 cm to the collection of Gilberto Chateaubriand/Modern Art Museum of Rio de Janeiro. Collage on a public scale!



What other artists do you admire?

I'm eclectic: from Lucien Freud, Mapplethorpe and Francis Bacon to Da Vinci, Goya, and Bosch.

Thanks Claudio!

Bridges by Nathaniel Whitcomb - Notpaper

Bridges by Nathaniel Whitcomb

It's true I don't often feature videos or motion on Notpaper, but that's because I don't come across things that often that I feel fit with the blog. Usually when I find a video I like, it's because I found their 2D collages first! As is in this case, with the motion collages of Nathaniel Whitcomb. Click below for some more details about this video... and enjoy!

From Nathaniel:

For the past several months I've been cutting up and digitally collaging together short films/music videos entirely out of old National Geographic magazines. For lack of a better term, I've been calling them "motion collages."

After scanning in my cut outs, I collage together scenes and then subtly inject them with life using AfterEffects. The results are slowly paced audio/visual stories that have been said to "make you feel like someone something slipped into your coffee."

About this video:

Created for the Holy Spirits debut ep "The Afternoon's Blood," this motion collage was hand cut out, scanned & digitally assembled entirely from a pile of 40 year old magazines. I've made videos for every song on the ep so keep your eyes peeled in the coming weeks for the rest of the set.

Credits:

Music: Holy Spirits
Art+Motion: Nathaniel Whitcomb aka Think or Smile

Merrick Angle - Notpaper

Merrick Angle

Merrick describes his work as "scratchy," and when I think of scratchy I think of loose pencil drawings and chicken scratch handwriting. But his work is actually quite orderly with some off-center elements and colour splats and scribbles thrown in for good measure. Sometimes it is hard to achieve texture in digital collages, so I like that he uses halftone dots and graph paper to make up for any loss of tactility.


Merrick Angle
doublemerrick.com and merrickangle.com
France (Originally from England)


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Scratchy, Collage, Retro, Angular, Atmospheric.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

Old magazines, photo albums, and general ephemera are a goldmine for me. I am lucky enough to live in an old, crumbly area of France, with loads of attics and junk shops. Science magazines from the fifties seem to be packed with stuff. Badly printed post war stamps, are another.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I have been working in collage on and off for fifteen years. I love the immediacy of putting two things together and getting something completely different! I have always collected the things that inspire me, and I suppose collage became the answer to 'Okay, now what do I do with this..?'




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I have a site - doublemerrick.com that stocks my prints and products. It just seemed to be the natural way to go, as I had a lot of interest in my work as prints and it has snowballed from there!

Do you have any formal art training?

Yep, art college. But I got sidetracked by the dead end of conceptual art. I got so pissed off, I didn't make anything for nearly five years. But now I am back stronger than ever. Like the Terminator with spray mount.

Explain your favourite techniques.

These days, nearly everything goes through the computer, specifically Photoshop. Comissioned work tends to be digital and have a tight deadlines, and often changes need to be made quickly. Something I would struggle to do with a knife, glue, and a sketchbook. However, I love the 'hands on' world of analogue, so this year I have set up my own screenprinting studio. There is something really magical about printing - the randomness, the speed...

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

The best piece I ever saw was some rusted BP van doors I found in a forest near our home. Just the most perfect mix between colour and rust. My first thought was 'Wow I wish I could paint something like that'. My second thought was 'You have a van and a hacksaw, you idiot'.



What other artists do you admire?

There are so many! The usual like Robert Rauschenberg and Francis Bacon. But these days I am more interested in the people working now. Folks like Mark Weaver, Cristiana Couceiro, and Thomas Schostok. It's a great time to be making art, the galleries and tastemakers no longer have a stranglehold over who sees what.

Thanks Merrick!

Tim Manthey - Notpaper

Tim Manthey

What drew me to Tim's work was the way fearlessly creates a story with disparate elements, letting it flow out naturally. Tim describes his process as moving an image across different pages until something "clicks", and I love when people do this because there is a totally unique new story every time!


Tim Manthey
http://cloudnectar.blogspot.com/
Seattle, WA


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Whimsically disturbing dream narratives.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

Mostly National Geographics from 1965-1985. The magazine during that era hit a stride with outstanding photography that showed the shifting cultures of our world like never before of since, and the ads are hilarious! I also love to incorporate my own drawings, and if I'm feeling adventurous, I'll splash some acrylic paint into the mix.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

For the past 15 years I have kept a sketch-journal as a disciplined way of recording LIFE; Comprised of drawings and writings, and only the occasional collage. Fall of 2009 is when I began some serious "cutting and gluing", and found the form so instinctive and surprising that it became almost addictive. So most of what I have on my blog is from the last 6 months.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I've spent years working professionally with glass. Both commercial and art.

Do you have any formal art training?

None. But a few design and illustration classes are in my future.

Explain your favourite techniques.

I flip through a magazine fast and let my eye catch a shape or color or "character". Then I cut it out and "travel" it over other pages, until something clicks into place. I never do this with just one image at a time. It's always about multi-tasking. Music is an important part of the process. I usually have the Flaming Lips, Miles Davis or Can playing. There are more techniques that I'd like to learn and develop. Collaging is still new to me.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

One I titled SECRET ELDERS. It shows half-bodied desert bedouins connected to a divine stairway, pouring dream nectar into the universe with a teapot. It's creepy and comforting at once.



What other artists do you admire?

Able Parris, Aaron Bagley, and Matthew Craven as far as collage artists. I also admire Van Gogh, Dr. Suess, D. Price(Moonlight Chronicles), and Tom Deslongchamp.

Thanks Tim!

Mike Bennion - Notpaper

Mike Bennion

I mentioned I was posting two assemblage posts yesterday, but time flies and I forgot! Here is the second, the work of Mike Bennion. The most obvious comparison is probably Joseph Cornell, but I am also not up to speed on assemblage as much as I am collage. His "boxes full of stuff" include many different treasures and findings. I love reading the "what do you like to work with" section of these assemblage interviews, because the answers are so varied and include so many things I would never think to make art with!


Mike Bennion
www.mylittlelovebox.com
London, UK


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Boxes full of stuff. 

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

Victoriana, daguerrotypes, rusty keys, medals, religious ephemera, old music paper, knackered wooden boxes, butterflies, shells, kids building blocks, thimbles, ribbons, dominoes etc.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

When I left college I was offered some collage illustration jobs based on my final show, although that wasn't an area i was looking to work in at the time. I thought I was a graphic designer. But I did it and enjoyed it, got an illustration agent. It was mostly flat, non-3-D at the time, always for clients like banks. After a few years I stopped doing it because there's only so many ways you can combine disparate, ugly elements like a photo of a bank and a ten pond note. 

Then, many years later,  at the beginning of this year it was my first wedding anniversary and my wife said 'make me something!' So I made the first box, 'One Year On', loved the process and decided to make more. So far the creative muse is going strong and I'm churning them out like a man possessed. Do you remember that scene in 'Close Encounters' where Richard Dreyfus keeps sculpting mud and mashed potato into a mountain shape? I'm a bit like that. If you didn't call it art then I think I should be sectioned.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

My day job is directing tv commercials. I can see an overlap in the two different media in terms of the aesthetics, I don't know if anyone else can. I get complete creative freedom with the collage work . That's always a struggle when you're working for an agency and a client on a 30 second ad. Many opinions go into the pot, my job as I see it it is to steer the final product in the right direction and ad my sensibility to it, whilst keeping everybody happy. I figure that's why they come to me, I have a certain approach...check out www.mikebennion.com, see what you make of it.

Do you have any formal art training?

I studied graphic design at college, first at Kingston University, then an MA at The Royal College of Art. Had a great time at both. They were good at making sure you mixed the creative urge with the practicality of gaining employment, finding the balance.

Explain your favourite techniques.

In all honesty I've never consciously had a 'technique'. I see an object or objects, feel that they talk to me on some level, belong together and to keep them apart would be a crime. The objects tell me what they want, I'm just the conduit, the vessel. It uses the subconscious part of the brain, like in a dream-state or meditation. I imagine it's a bit like talking to the dead. 

All the elements have a similar 'vibration', a feel to them, they often seem to have a past life that I must be attracted to.  Many objects have a similar or complementing texture and colour scheme. This allows each and any element to find a home easily. 

On a practical level, I consciously make them small so they don't take up too much space in the flat, stick the objects together with superglue and metal hooks. I try not to tell an obvious story with each piece, so that they can be interpreted in different ways by the viewer. 

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

To favour one more than another would be like a parent favouring one child above another. But if pushed it's always the last one I did.



What other artists do you admire?

Picasso, for seeing the world though childs' eyes and always changing, Schwitters, Rauchenberg and Cornell for the collage approach, Tony Hart and Rolf Harris for their enthusiasm they brought to art on tv when I was growing up, Fra Angelico for the simplicity and sincerity, Degas for the draughtsmanship. The Chapman Brothers for their mixture of technical ability and shock.

Thanks Mike!

Shelby Fischer - Notpaper

Shelby Fischer

Today I am going to show you two assemblage artists, a little different than paper collage but I think it is definitely in the same category. Shelby Fischer works with such a wide variety of items, I am sure she finds inspiration wherever she goes, or at least in everything. Her assemblages have lovely details and each piece tells a very interesting and dramatic story.


Shelby Fischer
www.shelbyfischer.com
I live on a farm in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains outside of Charlottesville, Virginia.


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Surrealistic imagery/mysterious narratives echoing long lost, twisted fantasies or nightmares.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

Hand cut vintage and ancient images found on the internet, a wide assortment of papers from around the world, ink, gold leaf, varnish, gel medium, mosaic tile, stone, found objects, vintage wood and ephemera from my barn, vintage children's blocks, old soda crates, vintage reflective wood traffic signs, vintage hood ornaments, vintage radiator covers, vintage croquet balls, vintage doll parts, and am currently using vintage sheet music covers from the 1920s-1950s that I rip into small pieces, ink the edges and then make into abstract collages. I also sew fabric collages using vintage hankies from the 1930s-1950s, lace, and other fabrics.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I began making collages about 5 years ago and I honestly have no idea what made me start the process. One impetus was taking a class with artist Ros Casey, called Mapping the Dark, an experience that opened my mind to the possibilities of connecting images to emotions. I attacked the art form with a vengeance and have never looked back.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I also work for the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz, an international jazz education organization, as a writer of scripts for all of our major jazz galas/events at places like the Kennedy Center, Kodak Theater, etc. and I also write speeches for jazz luminaries. Before I moved to my farm in Central Virginia eight years ago, I was a full time producer for the Institute. I also like to garden, do interior design, and I would secretly like to open a bakery in a vintage Airstream bus and travel around the world selling cakes and baked goods.

Do you have any formal art training?

Aside from art classes I've taken on and off over the years, no formal training.

Explain your favourite techniques.

All my work is intuitive and I can honestly say I do not follow any preconceived techniques.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

My favorite piece changes all the time, however, oddly enough it may be a very simple self-portrait assemblage I made out of odd bits found in my barn. It's on my web site.



What other artists do you admire?

There are so many incredibly talented artists creating work in every genre who inspire me on daily basis. A handful of those I admire and respect include but are not limited to: Jospeh Cornell, Max Ernst, Pablo Picasso, Lawrence Letscher, Kurt Schwitters, Romare Bearden, Rosalie Gascoine, Hannah Hoch, Hannelore Baron, Mark Wagner, Louise Nevelson.

Thanks Shelby!

Andrew Barrow - Notpaper

Andrew Barrow






I received an email about Andrew Barrow's letter/number collages made out of stamps and other elements. Take a look at more here.

(Oh, and here is Z)

Happy Valentine's Day! - Notpaper

Happy Valentine's Day!

Here is a piece I found particularly lovely on the Flickr pool, Face / Lace by Beth Hoeckel (aka bethfromabove). Keep posting, I love seeing everyone's new work! (if you don't celebrate Valentine's day, then Happy Monday!)

New Work: Vincent Pacheco - Notpaper

New Work: Vincent Pacheco

Check out this new work by Vincent Pacheco, aka Mudchicken. He has done a lot of new stuff recently but I particularly liked this series of collaged LIFE Nature Library reference books. More on his website!

Katy Gromball - Notpaper

Katy Gromball

I never know what to do with the paper I come home with from the Japanese Paper Shop, but Katy puts her pretty paper finds to good use! The result is very sweet, very detailed japanese inspired collage. (Perfect for Valentine's day, if you celebrate it!)


Katy Gromball
http://katygromball.blogspot.com/
Pont-a-mousson, rainy East of France


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Musical, craft, meticulous, warm.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

Music is always present in my work. Then, I use precious Japanese papers, recycled papers... sometimes threads and vintage materials (old wallpapers, illustrations from the 1950s - as in the 'pochi' series...)

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I've been cutting and sticking papers since... maybe 15 years or so... I've no idea of why I started creating collages, maybe I try to create a beautiful and peacful place. I've tried other techniques but I guess I felt closer to paper and thread than paint.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I am a artisan, a 'craftswoman'. But I have to work in a school for the moment, until I am able to live on my art.

Do you have any formal art training?

Not really. I attended  a few art classes at school, but it was a bit boring so I decided to practice on my own.

Explain your favourite techniques.

I have actually just one way to work. I choose a song and make a lot of sketches. I go over my materials and pick some. Once everything is gathered, I can start to transcribe what is in my head.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

I think I haven't made it yet.



What other artists do you admire?

Just to mention a few of them: Regina Spektor, Efterklang, mum, Patrick Watson, and of course Björk - who is the most accomplished artist to me - I'm also very fond of the Ai Yamaguchi's work.

Thanks Katy!

Nishat Akhtar - Notpaper

Nishat Akhtar

I love the way Nishat uses saturated colour and hints of florals, it's the perfect mix of masculine and feminine. I love hearing people's stories, and the places they've been, and Nishat has done a lot of different things (and I know she did a lot of traveling recently!) She doesn't have a lot of collage work yet, but I hope to see more with paper collected from her travels!


Nishat Akhtar
www.onedaynever.com
Philadelphia!


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

That hazy moment where a dream disappears and memory grasps.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

Old beat up things. Crackling aged paper, water stained paper... items that show their age and tell a story on their own. You can usually find this stuff in the back of a thrift store, old notebooks etc. Some of my favorite things to cut up are some of the hardest things to destroy, old National Geographics, and old Life Magazines etc. A few years ago I was at a state fair somewhere in the middle of Pennsylvania and found a huge stack of water damaged Life's and later that summer I found a ton of old National Geographic's that were already cut up a little. These were perfect. I also love old vintagy photographs. I think the search for these things, or how they come upon you (maybe something that was just laying in the street) is part of the magic of making things... seeing something special in something others would just discard.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

When I was a kid I used to look at editorial photography and rarely read the story. I would immediately have my own thoughts of what is going on rushing through my head when looking at an image. I tended to like to wander around that part of my imagination for a while. Making collages lets me cut apart these images and apply the story or feeling flying through my head. A few years ago I got really inspired by a stack of damaged old National Geographics I found. The saturated color and cracking paper felt worth salvaging, as did the images that were peeking through the rips and stains. That's when I started making collages as a good outlet for telling these stories, or collection of feelings.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I currently work as a graphic designer and have for years now, but I also have worked as a carousel horse painter, a barn hand (with real horses), was a waitress, a tattoo shop girl... It takes all things to get to where you are going sometimes! Right now I'm really into the journey and not the destination.

Do you have any formal art training?

I graduated from the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn in 2001. It was a great school and a wonderful time to be in New York.

Explain your favourite techniques.

Gathering things is such a big part of making collages. Spending the time to go vintage shopping, thrifting, or flea market shopping... I guess this isn't a technique, but it is one of my favorite parts of the process. You never know what you might find that will inspire you.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

I made a piece for my friends Erik and Dana when they got married. It was a specimen box with tiny slits in it that held 365 tiny hand made envelopes, each with a small message inside for their first year of marriage. It was a wooden box that my friend Josh helped me make... and then each note was hand cut out, as well as each envelope, hand cut out of vintage paper, folded and sealed. I love it because it felt like a living memory, and a scientific study of cataloged feelings.



What other artists do you admire?

I like a lot of different kinds of work... graphic design: Number one friend and daily artist inspiration is Erik Marinovich, one of the most talented designers I know. Amazing typographer, illustrator and designer. He and I talk pretty regularly and there is full transparency when we talk about our work. I think that is something a lot of artists and designers don't have. Sharing is learning, and keeps the wheels turning, so do it, don't hide your thoughts away from the world. Good things come from sharing. There is also Kat Macleod, incredible illustrator and collage artist, who I don't know personally, but admire her work immensely! Lastly, some epic inspirational artists for me, Joseph Cornell and Andrew Wyeth. Duh. I stop in my tracks and lose my breath any time I see a piece of these greats.

Thanks Nishat!

Nancy Goodman Lawrence - Notpaper

Nancy Goodman Lawrence

Nancy's work is so precise, so intricate, consisting of hundreds of little scraps of paper, coming together to create realistic family portraits. You don't see collage portraits very often, and I get really excited when I see them done well. It just seems so... impossible to me. But that's what makes them so interesting!


Nancy Goodman Lawrence
http://nancygoodmanlawrence.com
Los Angeles, CA (born in Pittsburgh, PA)


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Hundreds (!!) of small bits come together as a whole.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

My work is largely comprised of maps, cut-up and repositioned into work that falls into 3 categories: portraits, the figure and work based on concentric circles.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I have been working in collage for about 15 years. As a substitute teacher, a collage project I introduced to a class of children became an inspiration for my own work.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I am solely an artist, although I am a retired elementary substitute.

Do you have any formal art training?

I have a BA in art from UCLA and have used ongoing workshops to sharpen my drawing and painting skills.

Explain your favourite techniques.

I have developed a personal technique which is rather complex. My portraits and figurative work begin with a drawing on a sheet of paper and evolve into a collaged surface. In my circle collages, I do not use a drawing but begin with a circle and work outward from the center. The process is labour intensive and somewhat meditative.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

I don't know that I have an absolute favorite, although there is something about the very first piece I ever made that intrigues me - a collage of a dress on a hanger.



What other artists do you admire?

I tend to admire artists who do quiet work that vibrates off the surface into a third dimension - Hopper, Roschko and Morandi are three examples. However, among a long list of admired artists, I would include Egon Schiele, Romare Bearden and Matisse.

Thanks Nancy!

Totems by Denise Kupferschmidt - Notpaper

Totems by Denise Kupferschmidt

I came across these totem collages by Denise Kupferschmidt for the second time, and wondered why I hadn't posted them yet. I think they're really unique!

via All the Mountains.

SnP presents: Collage - Notpaper

SnP presents: Collage

An exhibition featuring work by Karen Kang,
Alisa Yang, Hope Kroll, Sam Lubicz and many more
Opening: February 12th, 2011 7-10pm
Smooth 'n Purdy Gallery
3015 Glendale Blvd, Los Angeles, CA

Call for submissions: BOLO - Notpaper

Call for submissions: BOLO

Marco Nicotra is producing a zine called BOLO, which will be printed in 5000 copies and distributed worldwide. The first issue is dedicated to STARS.

Deadline: March 1st, 2011

For more information please email Marco at ilike@bolomagazine.com.

Michael Waraksa - Notpaper

Michael Waraksa

Michael's illustration technique is comprised of extremely intricate collage pieces, which give his work a lot of depth and impact. His work of course is mostly digital, but I wanted to share it because I love all of the little details!


Michael Waraksa
www.michaelwaraksa.com also Flickr
Milwaukee, Wisconsin


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Evolving.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

Just about anything that catches my eye.Although I do do some collages by hand, many of these recent ones are digital. I find images in old books, magazines, labels, wrappers, etc. I also add my own drawing into the work. I spend a fair amount of time at my local library looking for interesting old books. Nature, science, technology, old advertising and dreams are some of themes running through my work.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I started in college. I liked the effect of juxtaposing like and unalike images or fragments of images next to one another.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I am a freelance illustrator.

Do you have any formal art training?

Yes, I attended an art school (Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design).

Explain your favourite techniques.

I use many layers and like playing with the transparent qualities of images.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

The one I am working on.



What other artists do you admire?

Max Ernst, Hannah Hoch, John Heartfield, George Grosz, Raoul Hausman, Tony Fitzpatrick, Christian Northeast, Katherine Streeter, Lou Beach--to name a few.

Thanks Michael!

The Dirtiest Hands - Notpaper

The Dirtiest Hands

An Exhibition of Prints by J.P. King
February 27th - February 10th, 2011
Opening: Wednesday, Feb. 23, from 6-8pm
Galerie Nota Bene
3416 Parc, Montreal, QC

Call for Submissions: Mékanik Copulaire - Notpaper

Call for Submissions: Mékanik Copulaire

Mékanik copulaire is searching for black and white collages.

Mékanik copulaire #2 - Collage Fanzine
Guidelines: Format 20cm x 24cm, Deadline May 2011

Please send your submission to mekanikcopulaire@gmail.com

See some examples of the first issue below!







Global Arts Projects Presents... - Notpaper

Global Arts Projects Presents...

The International Artists at Home and Abroad Exhibition Series
(featuring work by Mayuko Fujino, pictured)
Broadway Gallery NYC
February 4th - 25th, 2011
Reception: Thursday, February 10th, 2011, 6:00-8:00pm

Sarah Bridgland - Notpaper

Sarah Bridgland

I came across the work of Sarah Bridgland today, and it's really amazing. She makes these little paper sculptures out of type and old office supply boxes. They are so intricate and detailed! Check out more of her work on her website.









Brad Vetter - Notpaper

Brad Vetter

I was excited at the idea of seeing some collages from someone who works primarily with letterpress. I have always been a huge fan of letterpress printing, and Brad's collages really stand out because they work in the same kind of layering. (Brad doesn't have a huge body of collage work yet so I've included some of his work for Hatch Show Print, which I think fits in well!) Can't wait to see more work from him!


Brad Vetter
bradvetterdesign.carbonmade.com, smallestartgallery.com
Nashville, TN


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Where we have been, and where we want to go.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

I love working with old book covers. I like the idea of working with a layout that has already been determined for me and then I try to break that structure. I think it is easier if the first mark has already been made for me. I am also a fan of most vintage printed ephemera. I also use my misprints and backgrounds from my letterpress work.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I am pretty new to making collage. I have always been a scavenge/collector, but I recently started going to a Goodwill store where you can pay by the weight of the item. They have huge bins full of all these great old books. You can get about 10 books for something like 50 cents, so I had all these books to rebind to make sketchbooks. I realized that I don't really like making books, so I cut them up and started painting on them. I guess it's mostly a response to previously unfinished projects.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I work at a 131 year old letterpress shop in Nashville, TN called Hatch Show Print. I spend my day designing and printing show posters. I also train our interns in the art of letterpress and design. When I am done with the work day, I either stick around and print in the shop, or make things in my studio at home.

Do you have any formal art training?

I went to school for graphic design and printmaking. I spent most of my time in school away from the computer. I really liked to hand draw the type I needed or screen print my final designs. I just liked to have as much of my hand in the work as possible. I went to school with some great kids who pushed me to work hard, and teachers who pushed me even harder.

Explain your favourite techniques.

I love printing letterpress, it is such a tactile way to work with type and color. I have been printing letterpress for about 6 years now, and I am still learning new techniques & things I love about it. With both my letterpress show posters and fine art pieces I never feel limited by the process. I really like working hard for a final product, solely working on the computer always seems to easy for me. Having a chance to get my hands dirty is also nice.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

I am pretty excited about the drawings and collage work I have been doing lately. I think this is some of the first things I have been making that feel really cohesive. It is a great mix of the letterpress work I do, hand-drawn type, and using a lot of great vintage ephemera. It is hard to say that it is my favorite work, I think in six months I will be working on something else that I will like more.



What other artists do you admire?

I am a huge fan of Margaret Kilgallen. There is so much honesty and beauty in her work. She had such a great sense of color, typography, and humanity that makes her work so approachable. Raushenberg has been a long time influence in the things I make. I also like a lot of gigposter artists. Jason Kernevich and Dustin Summers (Heads of State) and Dirk Fowler (F2 Design) make incredibly clever work. Steven Powers, Richard Pearse, Brian Baker, Mark Weaver, Jim Houser, Nick Butcher, Nadine Y. Nakanishi, Jim Sherraden, Marcel Dzama, Stefan Sagmeister, Charley Harper, and anyone who is still hand-painting signs.

Thanks Brad!

Will Miller - Notpaper

Will Miller

I recently came across these graphic compositions made from fashion magazines by Will Miller, and I would like to share them. Apparently the collages were made by cut and pasting the images and then feeding the sheet of paper through an ink jet printer to add the type elements. So great! (Though I've tried this and it seems like printer jams are inevitable).






via Will Miller on Flickr.

Chris Macfarlane - Notpaper

Chris Macfarlane

You can tell Chris really appreciates the process of finding and collection precious ephemeral artifacts. People often ask me how I can cut up old books and papers, that it is destructive, but collage artists prove time and time again that it is the opposite--it is to cherish something so much that you need create with it, and give it new life. You can tell Chris appreciates the "thrill of the find" but also takes care in putting those finds to good use!


Chris Macfarlane
www.matchboxpeepshow.com, www.matchboxpeepshow.blogspot.com
Glasgow, UK


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

An unhealthy, messy obsession with paper and glue.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

Mostly old magazines & journals (my Dad recently found a big pile of medical journals from the 50's. It was like Christmas!) I also have a large collection of tickets and other bits of print that I've found on the street. I keep them all in a poly-pocket 'library' - surely the dictionary definition of 'geek.' 

I also do a lot of screen printing, and so generate material for collage that way. I've been known to break a number ink-jet printers by attempting to feed them old paper. That can be quite an expensive way to work...

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

When I was in my early 20's I kept a journal and was quite obsessive about filling it - It wasn't desperately personal, it didn't have a lock & key or anything but the more I went places and travelled, the more I would collect things to fill my journal. Then these items then started to become part of the sketches and notes I made and I think the whole thing kicked off from there.

Then, when I left Art School in 2005, I think I fell out of love with what I studied, 3D design, and so I started taking my collage work a bit more seriously.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I also teach Graphic Design at a couple of colleges here in Glasgow. I'd love to take that to the States for a year or so, just for the experience. Aside from that, I sometimes do design work when asked. I really enjoy the process, working with or for other people, totally different to me working in my studio.

Do you have any formal art training?

I studied Product & Furniture Design At Edinburgh College of Art but I always wished I'd switched to a 2D design discipline. I'm not sure if my training as a designer filters through to my artwork or not.

Explain your favourite techniques.

My work or any techniques I employ are fairly straight forward; Just spray or stick glue and a scalpel really. But I think my favourite technique has to be screen printing onto old books, there's no 'undo' button if it goes wrong.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

There was a piece I made when I lived in Berlin in 2007, 'Sandys Frozen Custard Root Beer,' that I'm very fond of for a couple of reasons; 1. because I remember so clearly making it in the flat I lived in and 2. because I remember finding the paper in a flea-market and just feeling like I'd found a diamond on the street. I'm sure I'd have been less precious with that paper if it'd been a bit of silver or gold. 



What other artists do you admire?

There are so many. Although, I've come to realise that looking at the work of other collagists is dangerous as it can so easily filter into your own work. Having said that, I really love Joseph Cornell's work and Peter Blake's prints are pretty inspiring. I just found a book on a guy called Massin. Wonderful stuff.

I'm also really lucky that I've met some really amazing people through the Print Studio here in Glasgow. There are 2 older guys, Philip Reeves and Norman Sutton Hibbert. Both well over 60, still working away like mad, printing and gluing, making such great work. I hope I'm like that in 30 years time.

Thanks Chris!

Mark Searcy - Notpaper

Mark Searcy

I love the way Mark puts his collages together, with what looks like mathematic precision and a strong sense of geometric space. His collages look vintage because of the imagery he uses but at the same time futuristic because of the way he assembles them. I have been a fan for a while but it seems his work just gets better and better!


Mark Searcy
www.thisdotcomtaken.com
Portland, OR


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Multi-dimensional narratives of complex minimalism.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

I work particularly with vintage magazines that were printed and designed by hand, without and before the aid of a computer was even invented. Magazines printed today are completely different, their images and glossy pages cause any collage to fall flat compared to the technicolor richness of the memories and reflection of something precious that was stitched together over time before this instant email blog monster came along and digitized them all away. Poof!

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

One could argue that ever since I started using photoshop to layer one picture on top of another, pixel on top of pixel, making clipping-paths and transparent effects without making a mess, that was when I started making and thinking in terms of collage. About a year ago, I turned to paper and glue as an exercise in remembering how to quit all of my applications, and stop checking my email and Facebook and stats and endless news feeds forever--to wipe the glue from my eyeballs and just collage. What I discovered is that a different approach depends on the other--where we've been connects us to where we are now sitting in front of our computers. 




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I am solely an artist, and I work in many other professions for money. Give me a hat, and I'll sell it. Now that's a work of art! I do many things, and I do them well, and I still have to eat and rent the same as you and everyone else. My dream job is no job at all, just money when I need it to live. I have enough to work on my own.

Do you have any formal art training?

Yes. I studied fine art in college, taking figure drawing and painting and art history one two and three, until I switched my major to graphic design and had another five years ahead of me learning typography and computers and the internet along the way. It was a brand new field of promise and wonder--the way to make money as an artist! Oh salvation! My baby artist is going to be able to earn a salary plus benefits! 

Explain your favourite techniques.

While searching for the hidden narratives that lie in the background of images and advertising, wait for the one that grabs at you a second time or more after you have turned the page, and don't waste any time cutting out what you saw. I'm often surprised at how many collages end up being made from just one of those pages, as well as the influence they have on the others.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

I will describe it without naming it, so you can figure out which one it is. A slice of desert looks like an open doorway to an outside world. Two people are walking toward it--a woman as small as a child and a man right next to her. Their path is suspended in nothing, between another doorway that is shrinking the farther and closer they walk together. 

(Alternate description: It's the one that is just two pieces of paper, with one of them cut in two, pressed flat on a bigger piece of paper between a layer of glue.)



What other artists do you admire?

Jason Kinney

Thanks Mark!

Nicole Pietrantoni: Print Media - Notpaper

Nicole Pietrantoni: Print Media

Take a peek at these amazing textural works on handmade paper by Nicole Pietrantoni! Found at Mint Design Blog.

William Emmert - Notpaper

William Emmert

I love how William takes something--which I consider strange to begin with--like wrestling images, and reimagines them as quirky, cartoon-like figures by painting and drawing onto the surface of the image. When I first saw these collage I didn't know if I liked them, they were so weird, bordering on grotesque even, but I am also drawn to the weird and their playfulness quickly grew on me!


William Emmert
http://www.flickr.com/photos/emmertwilliam/
Seattle, WA


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

A body slam onto a pile of my childhood memories.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

Old WWF wrestling magazines, my baseball cards, Lego set instructions, old stuff from my family, yearbooks, random manuals, etc.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I have been messing around with collage since I was a kid. So it makes it hard to pin point what made me start. It's just a part of what i do now. When I was a kid I made a costume from the movie Stargate out of cardboard, and that's kind of like a collage.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I just quit my job to move down to San Francisco to start grad school. So I guess I'm also a soon-to-be student.

Do you have any formal art training?

I have some.

Explain your favourite techniques.

The technique I use the most is drawing and painting over the surface of old print media. Which is a pretty straight forward process, but I love how much it flattens out the images and the freedom it gives me to play around. That's why I love to use my old baseball cards, because it allows me to focus on and glorify these objects that I cared so much about when I was a child.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

I have no idea. I try to like them all.



What other artists do you admire?

John Baldessari, Johnny Ryan, Mat Furie, and a bunch more.

Thanks William!

Notpaper is a blog dedicated to showcasing the work of international collage artists. We strive to meet the artists and understand the thoughts behind the process, so interviews with artists are a big part of what we do. If you are new to the site, please enjoy our archives featuring hundreds of collagists!   more 

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  • SnP presents: Collage

    An exhibition featuring work by Karen Kang,
    Alisa Yang, Hope Kroll, Sam Lubicz and many more
    Opening: February 12th, 2011 7-10pm
    Smooth 'n Purdy Gallery
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    An Exhibition of Prints by J.P. King
    February 27th - February 10th, 2011
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    Galerie Nota Bene
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    The International Artists at Home and Abroad Exhibition Series
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    Broadway Gallery NYC
    February 4th - 25th, 2011
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