April 2011 Archives

Cutters Edges - Notpaper

Cutters Edges

Cutters Edges
An Exhibition of Contemporary Collage
Curated by James Gallagher


April 29th - May 30th, 2011

Opening: Thursday April 28th, 6pm
Gestalten Space

Sophie-Gips-Höfe, Sophienstraße 21
Berlin 10178 Germany

Masters: Collage - Notpaper

Masters: Collage

When I received the book Masters: Collage (Major works by leading artists), I was pleased to see many familiar faces as well as many artists I had not yet heard of. The works chosen for this book (by curator Randel Plowman) vary in style and technique, but I think most of them lean towards the soft, blended, and textural. I look forward to delving in more and reading the statements from each artists. Available from Lark Books. Scroll down for a little preview, all of the following artists have been featured here on Notpaper, and I have linked to their interviews!


Above by Brandi Strickland

Above by Mary Emma Hawthorne

Above by Nicole Natri

Above by Robert Mars

Dawn Arseneaux - Notpaper

Dawn Arseneaux

Dawn's collages are an great take on surrealism, the subject matter is of course on the mark, but the thing that makes them great is the way her shapes blend together. She is creating crazy scenes and layouts that look like they were always arranged that way. Her pieces remind me of one of her influences, Dalí, because of the near seamlessness--her works are much brighter and more feminine though!


Dawn Arsenaux
http://www.flickr.com/people/msneauxneauxs-alter/
Seattle, Washington


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Surrealism & Dadaism meticulously blended, settling racing thoughts.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

I like using vintage papers: magazines, damaged books etc. I don't like to see a damaged book destroyed when it can simply be rejuvenated - giving it a second life.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I have been creating collages since 2009. It all started with a life defining event and It never stopped.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I am soley an artist.

Do you have any formal art training?

No formal training, self taught!

Explain your favourite techniques.

Hand cut & paste with scissors & spray adhesive.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

"8" - unborn fetus celebrating birth.



What other artists do you admire?

Clovis Trouille, Marc Chagal, Max Ernst, Egon Schiele, Dino Valls, Victor Vasarely, Gustav Klimpt, Maxfield Parrish, Salvador Dali, Beatrice Wood, Marcel Duchamp, Pierre Bonnard, Andre Breton, William Blake, Randi Antonsen, Fulchran-Jean Harriet & Hieronymus Bosch, are my main sources of inspiration.

Thanks Dawn!

Adriean Koleric - Notpaper

Adriean Koleric

Adriean mixes the rough and tumble with clean modern imagery from the 40s and 50s, creating bold new pictures reflecting on days past. His arrangements are refreshing, and I can't wait to see more of his handmade collages!


Adriean Koleric
www.thinkitem.com
Edmonton, Canada


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

On a mission to devour worlds one by one.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

I prefer to use a combination of magazine from the early 40's to mid 50's, modern day design publications and children's construction paper.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I've been doing collage off and on since childhood, but finally got serious about it a few years ago when I had collaborated with a couple of Artists on a piece of furniture I had designed called the 'Monster' Lamp. It was a simple form that allowed anyone to customize it as they saw fit. One of those people that I had approached, Chad Kouri, was a brilliant collage Artist from Chicago that I just happened upon. Working with him essentially got the collage bug back in me. From there I began to phase out my furniture design work and focused all my attention on collage. Starting with digital, then gradually returning back to handmade which is where I am right now.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I wish. I pay the bills drafting at an Architectural Millwork Shop by day and hit the cutting board in the evenings. It's actually nice to have that break to clear my head and get back at it with a fresh approach. Plus having your fellow employees not knowing what you do after hours adds that extra bit for me.

Do you have any formal art training?

My only form of post-secondary education is Interior Design Technology. Everything I've done creatively (Furniture Design, collage, painting, etc.) has been self-taught.

Explain your favourite techniques.

I like to spend a lot of time focusing on the backdrop surface before moving onto the collage components themselves. I work mostly on plywood which allows me to layer paint in an aggressive manner to the point where it's got the vibe of a wall surface you'd come across in the street. Weathered, scratched up, abused, etc. It just adds that extra bit of interest for the viewer, especially in person.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

I'm close. I'll let you know when I get there!



What other artists do you admire?

Off the top of my head i'd throw out Jeff Soto, Buff Monster, The Sucklord, Jason Atomic, Bigfoot One, Dr.Lakra, Chad Kouri, Mario Wagner, Motomichi Nakamura and Steve Seeley. Really digging his stuff right now. He always has these little brush strokes of all the colours he used in his paintings off to the corner like a tag. Inspiring work.

Thanks Adriean!

Cutting Edges: Contemporary Collage - Notpaper

Cutting Edges: Contemporary Collage

A very exciting release for so many collage artists is the book Cutting Edges, which was put together by James Gallagher. It is a spectacularly designed, wonderfully familiar collection of collages from today's most interesting artists, many of whom have been featured here. Thanks a bunch to James for putting it together, and for adding to the collage library! Scroll down for a peek at the book.



Above by David Wallace

Above by Eduardo Recife

Above by Dani Sanchis

Above by Max-o-Matic

Above by Vincent Pacheco

Above by Vlatka Horvat

Above by Emmanuel Polanco

Loes van Schaaijk - Notpaper

Loes van Schaaijk

These collages by Loes really caught my eye, I love the connection between painting, paper, and the inclusion of typographic shapes. You can tell how much thought goes into a piece before it is even conceived, and that measurements and cuts are thought out and precise, yet it still has that free spirited quality that collage usually has!


Loes van Schaaijk
www.loesvanschaaijk.nl
Arnhem, the Netherlands


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

A longing for intensity.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

Colourful pages of books I bought at a second hand bookstore and pages of nineteenth century novels that are in my bookcase for too long without ever being read.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

Actually I started with collages at art college, but they were never a priority, because I solely concentrated on painting. But during the last four years making collages became more important, because I love sitting in my studio cutting and pasting paper and seeing the works develop in a tranquil way.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I feel solely an artist, but I have a job for four hours a week for a foundation that rents studios for artists. Besides that I make flyers and posters for an art related company.

Do you have any formal art training?

Yes, two years at the Academy of Art and Design in Den Bosch en three years in Art College in Arnhem, the Netherlands.

Explain your favourite techniques.

I start by making a sketch on paper and that sketch has to be good, because altering the lay out is mostly destructive for the whole image. Sometimes when an alteration is necessary I have to destroy the collage and start all over again. The sketch is filled in with colored paper, pieces of photographs and pages of old books, mostly in small segments. Sometimes I also use acrylic paint or ink.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

That has to be the collage with the word "Nog". (English translation is "still") This was the first of the series with a height and width of 0.50-0.70 centimeters. I like that size: it is not too small and not too large.



What other artists do you admire?

Eva Hesse, Thomas Nozkowski, Ross Bleckner, Jasper Johns.

Thanks Loes!

Ice Cream Kingdoms - Notpaper

Ice Cream Kingdoms

Ice Cream Kingdoms is a project started by Jesse Treece and Delilah Jones, which is basically a mail art project where they send a spiral bound notebook around the world for different artists to make their mark in. There may be an exhibition in the future, follow the tumblr Ice Cream Kingdoms for more info!

From Delilah, a little manifesto:

What began as a synchronous meeting to collaborate across the vast expanse of inter-space, two collage artists with a desire to create magical narratives through the appropriation of found material have created the whimsical project "Ice Cream Kingdoms", a collaborative book that travels across both time and space from one artist to another, accumulating different elements of collage as it is passed along land and sea. A diverse group of artists with a flair for conjuring the wondrous and absurd have connected to manifest a growing expanse of the collective unconscious, portraying cultural landscapes, psychedelic dreamscapes, and all things humorous and human. With Simplicity in our method (and funk in our souls), the physicality of the medium allows for the ultimate expression of the nature of collage through building upon the previous artists work with freedom and fluidity. Both a reflection of our shamanistic thirst for the esoteric nature of being, and a desire to make honest art, the project's aim is to have no aim, but rather to change. Or to at least to get a good chuckle out of you.

Ana Benítez - Notpaper

Ana Benítez

Ana says her collage-making began after seeing a Russian Constructivist show at a gallery, but that her work has nothing to do with it. I do love how you can see the influence there, if ever slight, with the bright triangles and graphic elements. It is a much softer approach that the bright reds of this art style. It is so great to be able to pinpoint the moment you started something, and what your influence was!


Ana Benítez
http://www.anabenitez.es
Madrid (Spain)


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Storytelling in a vintage, nostalgic, evocative, clean and cozy way.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

I am inspired by old magazines and newspapers, pictures and illustrations mostly. I get them at markets, antique stores and even the street. I suppose that I find it easier to work with these kind of images than with actual ones, because they show unknown characters wich I can relate with the concept or the story that I want. Also I love the romantic mood and the colour of the distressed paper.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I have always appreciated this technique, but I have not dared to use it until recently. I went to an exhibition about Russian Constructivist Posters and what I liked the most were the collages. I was looking forward to arrive home to make one! Of course, my collage work has nothing to do with Constructivism, but my interest was awakened by it.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I work as an Art Director at entropy, an advertising and marketing agency. It is pretty creative and artistic as I daily work composing images, but at the end, it is subject to the client decision and the objective of the work itself (selling the product), so in my free time I look for another way of expression as collage or photography, and now I have just started painting.

Do you have any formal art training?

I studied Audiovisual Communication and then Graphic Design. I never could study Arts, I am terrible at freehand drawing!

Explain your favourite techniques.

Handmade Collage and digital work.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

I don't know if it is better or worse than the others, but my favorite is "Libre". Obviously that who is running is me.



What other artists do you admire?

Magritte, Lissitzky, Degas, Max Ernst, Anglada Camarasa, Richard Hamilton, Mondrian and many more.

Thanks Ana!

Leah Tacha - Notpaper

Leah Tacha

Leah's work is something you rarely see, fashion-forward girliness with a sporty vibe. The result is a cutting edge kind of style that puts masculine and ultra-feminine in the same category. Really different, thanks for sharing Leah!


Leah Tacha
www.leah-tacha.com
I originally hail from the great state of Kansas, but I am currently living in Brooklyn, NY


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Oh boy... ok: confidence, belief, power, ridiculousness, alienation, athleticism, adoration, plasticity, mysticism, fluid.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

Right now I am obsessed with ESPN magazine and Vogue. I've also been having my brother mail me photos of his favorite basketball players of all time, then taking those apart and using them. Prismacolor markers are huge for me, sparkles, glitter, shiny contact paper, and good old fashioned graphite pencil. I have this ridiculous stash of bits of paper color coordinated in my studio that I'm interested in simply for their texture or pattern. I think collagists, or any mixed media artist for that matter, has a bit of a hoarding problem. You can't throw anything away because you never know when you'll use it!

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I have been using collage for quite a while now as a part of my process (if we're getting specific probably somewhere around 8 years?) Creating collages has always been such a relief for me when I feel stuck with my work. It is such an immediate way to get your ideas worked out. I also work in sculpture, and I feel like collage is another way to create sculpture, just on a flat relief rather than in real space. Its so exciting for me to take something out of its original context, say a picture of Rihanna for example, and place her in an entirely new space and how the reading of that character and that new space transforms. You can give things so much power in collage and you don't have to worry about it making any kind of real "sense", it can just be a feeling.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

To make a living, yes I have to work another job. During the day I work for a non-profit Urban Planning research organization which has been really interesting learning how cities are built and why they are designed that way. I've been super lucky at this current position, the President of the company is married to an artist, so he has been so understanding of what it means for me to be an artist and what I need sometimes--like in February he allowed me to take the entire month off to go to an artist's residency in Vermont, and then I got to come back to the job when I returned from the residency. How many people get that lucky?! Not too many. I felt very fortunate.

I am also interested in promoting younger, emerging artists here in New York and so a few friends of mine and I have developed our own arts organization called Homestead Gallery that holds one night only openings in people's homes in order to showcase the work of underrepresented artists in a non-conventional gallery setting. This has been an amazing way to meet new artists here in Brooklyn. Other than that I just try to get to my studio as much as possible in the evenings and I have Fridays off, so Friday-Sunday are my big studio days.

Do you have any formal art training?

Yep... got a BFA in painting and an MFA in sculpture... I did the whole shebang.

Explain your favourite techniques.

I'm not sure if I have a specific "technique" that I like to use. I usually start out by cutting out whatever forms I find to be most interesting, and then I make sure that I cut them out super carefully so as to keep the specificity of the form, and then I lay all of those pieces, forms, textures, figures out on my table and start creating compositions with them and thinking about what I want these drawings to be and what I want them to do: what kind of energy I want them to evoke, emotions, movement, and forms I need them to be. Then from these compositions I think about how I could turn these drawings into sculpture, and how they could play off of each other. The collages always inform the sculpture and then the sculptures inform the collages and the drawings. I want everything to play off of each other.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

Oh my goodness... I'm not sure I have created my favorite piece ever. Doe that ever happen?! Let's see, I am really in love with these basketball collages I've been making lately, such as this one. I'm also interested in this collage for its use of such a hugely popular music video (aka Beyonce's Single Ladies) and taking those figures and literally placing them on top of their own world. I like whats happening between the male and female versions of power in my work right now, and the balance that they have off of each other. When the drawings are next to each other, something really special happens between them that I can't quite describe. They're not "alive" technically, but they are definitely not just stagnant objects either, they're somewhere in between and that is one of the most exciting things to me about making these collages.



What other artists do you admire?

Ah! So many! This list could go on forever... I'll try to keep it short: Yayoi Kusama, Claes Oldenburg, Jessica Jackson Hutchins, Lynda Benglis, Eva Hesse, Jonas Wood, Amy Sillman, Franz West, David Altmejd, Louise Bourgeois, Picasso, Judith Linhares, Matisse, Mary Heilman, Helen Frankenthaler, Judy Pfaff, Elizabeth Murray, Sonia Delanay, Tara Donovan, Molly Larkey, Phyllida Barlow, ay ay ay... so many wonderful artists.

Thanks Leah!

Steven Riddle - Notpaper

Steven Riddle

I love the was Steven creates each piece of his collages by hand, to avoid any borrowing, and uses a wide range of techniques to do this. Because of this his collages are abstract, it's hard to read into them as though they are telling a story, they just sort of are. I really like the way changing up your materials gives you freedom but also a challenge to create something exciting from nothing!


Steven Riddle
steven-riddle.com
Baltimore, MD


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Colorful works on paper using a variety of media.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

It is important to me that I create all of my own source material, these are made up of a wide variety of mediums, oil based-monotypes, screen prints, acrylic, enamel, gouache, ink and marker. I have boxes filled with abandoned pieces that I cut and re use.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I have been creating collage for about two years. My work has really evolved since my discovery of the efficiency of double sided tape.




Do you have any formal art training?

Yes I got my BFA at MICA and currently I'm in the MFA program at Towson University. Also I trained as a faux finisher.

Explain your favourite techniques.

cut and tape.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

My favorite piece will always be the next one that I make. I love making new work, I wish I could just make things in my studio all day and all night all the time.



What other artists do you admire?

I really admire my friends and peers. Amy Boone-McCeesh, Carolyn Case, Michael Dotson, Alex Ebstein, Seth Adelsberger, Edward Max Fendley, nik planck, Jordan Bernier, John Bohl, Lesser Gonzalez Alvarez and Caitlin Cunningham. all really great artist.

Thanks Steven!

Nathalie Boutté - Notpaper

Nathalie Boutté

These pixel-like paper sculptures by Nathalie Boutté are so interesting!
See more of them on her website, here.

Richard Leach - Notpaper

Richard Leach

Richard's collages seem to speak quietly. His pieces have a really nice softness to them, in texture and in chosen imagery. He sticks to neutral paper colour tones, and the text and imagery in each piece feels like it is coming to the surface, breaking free of the plainness--everything blends so well!


Richard Leach
tinkwig.deviantart.com
Pike County, Pennsylvania


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Avoiding the expected, sometimes almost making sense.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

For the backgrounds of small pieces, I like playing cards or pieces of cardboard cut to playing card size and shape. For larger pieces I like plain cardboard. I use pieces that turn up, such as the backs of sketchpads or pieces that come in the mail as stiffeners. And I cut up household packages - cereal boxes, cracker boxes - and use the unprinted side. I'll use white or black paper sometimes too.

For the collages themselves my main sources are old books, catalogs and junk mail, and the Sunday New York Times. I have two early twentieth century books that I've been cutting up and taking apart for a couple of years, one of poetry and the other an old automotive mechanics textbook. But I'll use anything that catches my eye - old comic books from my basement, scraps of product packaging, parking garage receipts, old film negatives. Collage-making friends give me scrap too.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I've made collages on and off for thirty years or so, but much more off than on until 2009. Early that year I began doing collage a lot - every week if not every day. I've made over 200 pieces since then. I began it because the artists' collages I saw greatly appealed to me, and it was a freeing, expressive art that didn't require special materials.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I am a poet as well as an artist. My secular poetry is online and in print-on-demand books from my lulu bookstore. My sacred poetry - words for hymns and anthems - is in print from a number of publishers. And I've been a homemaker since 2004 - before that I had a couple of other careers.

Do you have any formal art training?

I have minimal formal art training, from high school classes in the 1960s. I'm essentially self-taught.

Explain your favourite techniques.

My key technique is conceptual. I'm not an illustrator. I don't begin a piece with an idea of what it's about or where it's going. I pick up scraps and see how they look together, assembling them intuitively, finding what the piece is as I make it. Favorite techniques in the craft sense are using text snippets; staining paper with tea; removing text from old book pages with tape, leaving a few words showing; and using the odd-shaped pieces that are left over after cutting things out. I went through a phase of doing a lot of image transfers with clear packing tape, but am not doing that much at the moment. I try to move on to something different if I've leaned on a particular technique for a while.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

I have a number of favorites from my work and can't single one out as "the" favorite. But I'll mention "Freedom" because my wife laughed out loud when I showed it to her. It's on a playing card over which an old poetry book page stained with tea was glued. Most of the text on the page was taken off, but one word still legible is "dream." There is a man in black from an old comic book coming out of a red boot from an early 2010 clothing catalog. And across the top of the collage is the word "Freedom" from the label of an old car battery that has been sitting in my front yard for a number of years.



What other artists do you admire?

Twentieth century artists I admire include Joseph Cornell, Cleve Gray, Robert Motherwell, Kenneth Patchen and Kurt Schwitters. Among people working today, Henrik Drescher and Fred Free.

Thanks Richard!

Painting with Pictures 2 - Notpaper

Painting with Pictures 2

Painting with Pictures 2
Curated by David Gibson
April 7th - May 7th, 2011

Opening: Thursday April 7th, 7pm at Artjail
50 Eldridge Street, 6th floor
New York NY 10002

This exhibition explores the use of collage as an artistic medium, dissecting its impulses and agendas while providing a wide cross-spectrum of its usage in contemporary art. It addresses the role of material culture in mediating our shared view of reality, the notion of a borrowed aesthetic, and how specific visual agendas express differing cultural attitudes. It includes a variety of mediums and aesthetic agendas, presenting not only traditional collage, but works which establish a collage mentality in the liminal forms of photography, video, digital manipulation, painting, sculpture, printmaking, children's books, commercial signage, portraiture, and others. In the end, it will posit collage as a cause, rather than a symptom, of both artistic style and generational meaning.

More about the show here.

via Lillianna Pereira, above image by Lillianna as well.

Lyndsey Lee Denyer - Notpaper

Lyndsey Lee Denyer

Lyndsey's work has retro qualities (with the geometric shapes and colour schemes) but the way she uses them makes them very up to date. I am drawn to the clever geometry in her pieces, her concentration towards the placement of paper makes her collages. Can't wait to see more from her!


Lyndsey Lee Denyer
www.lyndseyleedenyer.com
Originally from Florida, now living in Portland, OR


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

My work is personal, yet it aspires to be relevant to the greater world.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

My most favorite items to work with are vintage magazines from the 50's and 60's. There is so much content in the advertisements and current events of that era that are relevant today. I just really love the weight of the paper and the printing as well. I am always on the look out for scrap paper and textiles, old books and pamphlets. The older the better. On occasion, when I am am feeling frivolous I will go buy fancy papers at the neighborhood craft store, but I really enjoy searching through piles of old stuff at thrift stores. I find I get inspired this way.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I have been doing collage since I was first handed a glue stick. I seem to have a primitive need to assemble items to my preferred aesthetic. Not just in collage but in everything I do. Some might call this Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, but it all makes perfect sense to me. I took a break from collaging for a year or two during school, and tried to focus my energy into painting as I was encouraged by a professor. The satisfaction I get from collage was absent with painting. As soon as I finished school I returned to collage almost exclusively, and was much happier making my personal work that way. It was then, that I began to treat collage as final works, rather than exercises (which for some strange reason is how I was taught to treat them). For me, it seems to be the best way I can communicate visually.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I occasionally do freelance design and illustration. Mostly posters and merchandise for my friends' bands. For the past couple of years I have been working with the wonderful, Portland based, art and record label Hometapes on just about everything (mail order, design, tour support with bands, PR, etc.). I have also been working in record stores for the past 5 years just to keep things interesting.

Do you have any formal art training?

I studied Painting and Printmaking at the University of North Florida. A great little school in Jacksonville, FL that nobody has ever heard of. All I cared about when I was 18, was that the school was close to the ocean so I could go surfing. Now I am studying Graphic Design at the Pacific Northwest College of Art here in Portland. I am taking it a little more serious this go around.

Explain your favourite techniques.

I usually start with a single image that I really like, or a combination of images that excites me. I cut them out and start arranging and re-arranging them. This is my one of my favorite parts of the process. Everything is loose and I just get to play. I also enjoy the most tedious of tasks, so adding the final details (pen work and stitching), once everything is glued down, gives me great satisfaction.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

It is hard to choose a favorite because for me it changes so often. My pieces are always falling in and out of favor, one day I will love something, and the next I am not sure how I feel about it. Learning to leave them alone once I declare them finished has been a challenge that I have had to overcome.



What other artists do you admire?

There are so many talented folks in Portland, but Mark Warren Jaques and Adam Baz are two of my local favs. Hometapes visual artists Nick Butcher and Nadine Nakanishi of Sonnenzimmer, and Cody Hudson get me stoked. The WAFA Collective folks are always inspiring. On a grand scale, Robert Rauschenberg, Frank Stella and John Cage. Also the kids in the print studios at PNCA, I see some really awesome stuff happening in there!

Thanks Lyndsey!

Call for Submissions: Friday on my Wall - Notpaper

Call for Submissions: Friday on my Wall

Call for Submissions

Friday on my wall
May 6 at the Anu School of Art, Canberra, Australia.

Mail art collage show to be held at the ANU school of art, organised by Patrick Larmour. This is an excellent opportunity to exhibit your latest and greatest work to a contemporary art audience in the capital city of Australia! The more the merrier! Let's show just how amazing collage can really be!

Deadline May 1st. No theme. No size restrictions. Work will not be for sale.

Work shall be kept by myself (John Hart) for use in future collage exhibitions. Otherwise, if you would like the work returned you will need to organise and pay for return postage.

Send work to:
John Hart
17 Allwood Street
Chifley ACT 2606
AUSTRALIA

More information about the project can be found at the following:
http://fridayonmywall.wordpress.com

Damp Patches by April Gertler - Notpaper

Damp Patches by April Gertler

April Gertler recently emailed me about her kickstarter project for an artist's book, Damp Patches, that she is working on. Be sure to check out the video and also read on about the project. If NP had sponsors this is just the sort of thing we would support! Maybe one day...


In October 2010 I was invited to Paris for an artist residency at l'entreprise culturelle. Out of that residency came DAMP PATCHES - which is a new collection of work I developed into an artist book that mixes my collage work with photography and drawing. The title of the book comes from the loose translation of a deodorant ad from the French fashion magazine Votre Beaute (1973): Prisonnière des taches d'humidité sous les bras. - A prisoner of damp patches. Continue reading

Irina and Silviu Szekely - Notpaper

Irina and Silviu Szekely

These collages by Irina and Silviu Szekely are so stunning! Being comprised of images of realistic paintings and detailed photographs, these pieces look like they should be hanging in a museum somewhere. I really love how they pay attention to space in the works, acknowledging the perspective appropriately, so each piece looks "real." Also, I'm always glad to see some more team effort!


Irina and Silviu Szekely
http://www.wix.com/irinasisilviu/papercollages
born in Romania, living in UK


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Experimental juxtapositions of pseudo-spaces and altered realities.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

Magazines and books.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

We started making collages six months ago as an attempt to feed our imaginary meanderings in a foreign and alienating land.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

We work full-time in another profession.

Do you have any formal art training?

None whatsoever.

Explain your favourite techniques.

Cutting paper using scissors and sometimes paper cutter, using white tack to assemble the pieces for scan.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

[ readiness to serve, and refusal to compromise ] - because of its balanced disproportional quality to stand.



What other artists do you admire?

Hans Bellmer and Vilhelm Hammershøi are the first that come to mind.

Thanks Irina and Silviu!

Notpaper is a blog dedicated to showcasing the work of international collage artists. We strive to meet the artists and understand the thoughts behind the process, so interviews with artists are a big part of what we do. If you are new to the site, please enjoy our archives featuring hundreds of collagists!   more 

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Upcoming Events

  • Cutters Edges

    An Exhibition of Contemporary Collage
    Curated by James Gallagher
    
April 29th - May 30th, 2011
    
Opening: Thursday April 28th, 6pm
    Gestalten Space
    
Sophie-Gips-Höfe, Sophienstraße 21
    Berlin 10178 Germany

  • Painting with Pictures 2

    Curated by David Gibson
    April 7th - May 7th, 2011

    Opening: Thursday April 7th, 7pm at Artjail
    50 Eldridge Street, 6th floor
    New York NY 10002

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Books

  • Masters: Collage


    Major Works by Leading Artists

    Curated by Randel Plowman

    This superb new collection offers a stunning look at contemporary collage work from approximately 40 leading artists.

    Available from Lark Books.

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  • Cutting Edges: Contemporary Collage


    Edited by R. Klanten, H. Hellige, J. Gallagher

    Cutting Edges documents the new heyday of collage in current art and visual culture.

    Available from Gestalten.

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