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Vital Lordelo - Notpaper

Vital Lordelo

I love how Vital's collages can't possibly be old because of the newness and originality of their composition, but they look aged and worn like historic artifacts. He really places emphasis on this quality, and it's a really special detail.


Vital Lordelo a.k.a Dom Vital
domvital.org / Flickr
Porto Alegre, Brazil


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Surrealism, pop art, collective unconscious.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

Magazines (especially the old ones) and photographs.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I've started my work in 2005 and since then I have been continually in the process.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I am an artist, but also work with pictures and show posters. But the art market (galleries, exhibitions and orders) doesn't give me the feedback I need to support myself.

Do you have any formal art training?

I took some drawing and oil painting classes but have never finished any of them.

Explain your favourite techniques.

I like the wear and the error. I like to make papers dirty, to tear and to crumple them up in order to turn them more into a texture support, rather than an image itself.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

I can't point one right now, but it will appear someday. I think I am too young to have a favorite work.



What other artists do you admire?

Richard Hamilton, Modigliani, Van Gogh, Braque, Robert Rauschenberg, Nelson Leirner, Tide Hellmeister and Os Gêmeos

Thanks Vidal!

Becky Howes - Notpaper

Becky Howes

I really enjoy Becky's work. She is totally unafraid of colour (though tastefully she usually sticks to one or two) and she has a wonderful range of techniques she puts to use. I love the marbled way she applies (paint?) that almost looked like melted crayons to me. It's fun and she brings life to all the people present in her collages. If you are in Northampton, she is part of an end of degree show that will be on until the 15th of June. Download details here.


Becky Howes (Dessin De Passion)
blog & portfolio & flickr
Essex, England


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Fluid, Natural, Historic, beauty, illustrative, poetic, conversational, conscious, experimental, alive!

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

I tend to work with old photographs, mainly family ones that have been in the family for a fair old number of years. I also sometimes work with my own photography which I think will build up the more I travel and build on archiving. I definitely prefer black and white old photographs, just because of the feel and quality they have to them, also people looked different then! I also use my own traditional prints, mainly mono or collographs. Print making is such a beautiful lost art.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I have been flirting with collage for most of life now. I often seem to get distracted my other mediums and than something pulls me back to it. It's only been this year really that I have solely immersed myself into the collage world.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I am currently in my third year of studying illustration at university, this takes up most of my time at the moment. I also have a little side job to help pay the bills and I also create Jewellery. So yes I would say predominantly an artist.

Do you have any formal art training?

As mentioned above, just finishing my degree in illustration at the University of Northampton.

Explain your favourite techniques.

Oh techniques, to be honest I love working in many different mediums, have had to narrow myself down though. I love traditional print making, I can get lost for hours in the print room. Also paper cutting and folding, just generally working with paper has always been something that fascinates me.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

Well reasonably recently actually, was when i created "the two lovers", when I first incorporate ink drawing with collage. It just has this quality to it that I really wanted to exploit. I have been developing this technique ever-since.



What other artists do you admire?

Ohh soo many! Heres a few- John Stezaker, of course! His work is just so beautiful and opened up so many doors for myself. Max-O-Matic, very talented individual. The old greats such as Hannah Hoch and John Heartfeild. And Jamie Reid. Its amazing when something can be so easily said through collage, a picture of a thousand words.

Thanks Becky!

Graham Hutchinson - Notpaper

Graham Hutchinson

I love the raw feeling of Graham's work, how he assembles many layers and different tones of paper. The colours in his collages are very natural and warm, and the black and white photos of people he integrates into them draw me in.


Graham Hutchinson
www.grahamhutchinson.blogspot.com
Sheffield, UK


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Despondency. Love.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

Old magazines, newspapers, books... I find the more aged, weathered or damaged the material is, the more the material corresponds to the subject matter/the ideas I create. Along with scouring in charity shops for source material, my uncle runs a waste paper-recycling business so I get lots of interesting stuff from him too.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I've been in love with collage for around about five years. Prior to this I made installations and drawings. I found collage to be a quick way to get an ideas down. It seemed really raw and honest. Never looked back.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I split my time equally by supporting adults with Autism, as a Support Worker and time in the studio.

Do you have any formal art training?

MA, BA (hons) Fine Art

Explain your favourite techniques.

I have to count 'thinking' as a technique (without sounding pretentious), I do spend lot of time in my studio not doing anything but thinking. I then usually start with figures, males or females and try to create some narrative in my head that I would like to share with people. After that, scissors and glue.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

I suppose I feel most comfortable with a series of collages I made entitled 'Scraps Of Us/Whilst Listening to Cocorosie's Noah's Ark'. Built from clippings of the human form, my intention was to create a snapshot of two lovers. Upon completion of the series I found them to have more layers than I expected. I see them equally as positive and negative in their appeal.



What other artists do you admire?

Marcel Duchamp. Robert Rauschenberg. Maurizzio Cattelan.

Thanks Graham!

Ashkan Honarvar - Notpaper

Ashkan Honarvar

Ashkan has a very diverse body of work, and I very much recommend that you visit his website to take a look at it all. I had a hard time deciding which series to feature, so I just chose two that resonated with me personally. The first series, Individualism, is one I enjoyed for its use of landscape imagery and portraits simultaneously. In the second series, the void, all images are black and white and he works creatively with the negative space, filling up cutouts with pattern and texture to complete the image.


Ashkan Honarvar
www.ashkanhonarvar.com
The Netherlands


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

A reflection of the human body.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

All original printed materials. Old and new. But specially medical and scientific books.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

Almost 7 years now after I saw some collages from the propaganda artist John Heartfield. I got so fascinated by his technique. The way he used existing material to tell his story was unique.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

Just an artist.

Do you have any formal art training?

Yes, a BFA in illustration.

Explain your favourite techniques.

Handmade collages! There are 2 kind of collages. You have the handmade and you have the digital ones. There are a few artist/designers that can really produce something beautiful and interesting with the digital medium. But it can get quite boring. There is just no any restraint. You can scale, rotate, flip etc. As with the handmade collages it's more challenging. Here you have more restraints that can make the final piece more interesting and rewarding.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

It's actually a project that I'm very proud of. It's called Ubakagi and it took me over one year to finish it. It's one of my most conceptual works up to date.



What other artists do you admire?

Three persons I really admire are actually all photographers. Boris Mikhailov (specially the Case History project) Antoine D'agata (he really vanishes in his own project, it's too scary) Jeffery Silverthorne. I think he's the only one able to mix death and beauty the way he does.

Thanks Ashkan!

▲° - Notpaper

▲°

Hi everyone, we're back. Today's interview is with someone who shall remain nameless, or rather has chosen the name ▲°. I chose this selection of collages for their lovely, muted colour scheme, and soft on the eyes appeal. And the ones that stand out so starkly--I found it interesting how the work varies in colour choice when collaborating with fellow collage artist Andrei Cojocaru. Makes sense!


▲°
http://www.flickr.com/photos/25959430@N06/


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Material and process lead explorations of subjective and objective experience.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

I guess I love it all really, there are so many ways materials can be introduced that the reason for enjoying it or not varies. I'm always on the hunt for different inks and printing methods to combine with papers I use for collage. Otherwise I'm digging in any paper formatted document for certain weights, colours, textures and generally imagery that might provoke ideas. Recently I have been working from a book called 'The Family, a social history of the 20th century'.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

Collage began gradually for me in 2009 whilst doing a foundation degree; Realizing I had unlimited free access to a photocopier whilst I was studying must have helped considerably in constructing some sort of fascination to paper.

After filling a couple of sketchbooks with quick abstract photocopying experiments I was then introduced by my housemate to this one piece of material that solidified my curiosities with working with paper. It was a series of architectural planning documents for a house in France (found in a skip in Plymouth). It's ageing had so much to it, the paper had turned a subtle beige and the ink degraded to varying dark toned purples and reds, it was complete with hand rendered dotted and dashed markings over highly contrasted images of houses, the best thing about it though was its size; a little taller than A4 and about 13ft in length folded up like a concertina! Ever since it came into my work I have been on the hunt for unique pieces of paper.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I'm a student studying a creative course and my aim is to make a profession out of my work in some way, hopefully with my fellow artists' from 'Limited press collective'.

Do you have any formal art training?

Other than university, no.

Explain your favourite techniques.

I like to work with materials I can develop before creating work out of them. I also enjoy getting pretty hands on, sometimes I use a really thick rubber based ink applied thinly over printed material that allows for text and image to subtly show through yet you get a really solid black too. I use scalpels and fixatives mainly but with what can be done digitally I'm eager to try new things on computers, they have ever evolving possibilities. Working out compositions is something I'm yet to be able to explain as a technique, sometimes what to do is right in front of you, other times its not even around. Either way when you know you're getting it right it's one of the most satisfying things you can do.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

It really is the development in my work that I get most satisfaction from, but if we're talking about singular works then I would say my latest A2 pair which are on my Flickr (one contains half an image of a cat and the remaining half is silhouetted in a skyline).



What other artists do you admire?

WAFA collective, Robert Rauschenberg, Kurt Schwitter, Sol LeWitt, Franz Kline. Anyone who is the author if an image I have added to my favourites on Flickr and finally all the Limited press collective; Ryan Orme, Tom Mattison, Joel Wyllie, Dan Paton and Josh Rose.

Thanks ▲°!

Leslie Siegel - Notpaper

Leslie Siegel

Leslie has a lot to say about her work and process, which is okay because she is so interesting! I was especially drawn to her collages using strips of paper. They are subtle and multi-dimensional--she works with very flat, simple layouts, but the textures she includes make everything really jump off the page. I loved reading in her interview about the way she came to work in such a linear way, first with ribbons. Read on!


Leslie Siegel
http://www.lesliesiegelwork.com
Brooklyn NY


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

I'm after the curious conversation between incongruous images.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

Yes to all three. I use all kinds of printed material but am only inspired to use very particular images and I know them when I see them. I'm attracted to discarded imagery that feels obscure and doesn't fall into any recognizable category. I'm drawn to basic, elemental, not-decorative materials and very often like the back of something more than the front. Right now I'm using the backs of old tempera paintings on paper made my boyfriend when he was 5. I'm also drawn to badly manufactured, ill-conceived materials that have a throwaway, rejected quality: a bad print run, stationery that didn't sell, stickers with no stick left, etc. I avoid the cliches of this genre including anything kitsch, velvet, paint by number, etc.

The appeal of this kind of media is giving a new home/creating another context for otherwise useless-feeling images that should never have been made in the first place because they create more waste and no one ever needed them. The best of this kind of material can be found in close-out stores that kindergarden art teachers go to stock up on popsicle sticks, looseleaf paper, foam santa parts and other small joys. I seek these stores out wherever I travel and have to make extra room in my luggage for overflowing shopping bags full of junk I might never end up using. (speaking of waste) At the other end of the spectrum I'm equally attracted to "high art" images contained in old gallery pamphlets of artist's past shows which I then combine with other unrelated imagery thus re-creating the original work--more appropriating; the appeal of all collagists. So of course I spend a lot of time in old bookstores, flea markets and yard sales looking for that hard to place image.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I've been making art since I was a little girl. My parents used to give me boxes of wood pieces and pipe cleaners and felt and I would sit around gluing them together. I was kind of lonely. My father rarely came home and my mother was depressed and distracted so art, chocolate and Gilbert O'Sullivan were my saviors. I started making a form of collage more than 20 years ago which were rows of ribbon glued onto plywood. I set out to make these pieces as a way to slow down and stop rushing through things--I was hoping that this deliberate process would help me find order and that I would become a more patient person.

After exhausting the curling ribbon options from the stationery store, I found my way to satin, velvet, felt, foam, industrial belt ribbon, lace, elastic, snaps, etc. Sometime later, after I lost my studio and had to work in a smaller space, I began collaging, still focusing on stripes, with paper glued onto paper. I have since opened up to a world beyond stripes which has been liberating but I still crave the order and clarity of stripes.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I work as a freelance prop stylist/set-maker for print and digital media. If it's food photography, I get all the dishes, surfaces, etc; an interior, I choose the furniture or style the room-- I am responsible for creating the environment for whatever we're shooting, big or small. I am also currently co-producing a documentary film and have directed another short film.

Do you have any formal art training?

I went to The School of Visual Arts in NYC but dropped out after a year. I was never good at school because of various learning issues but I work well independently.

Explain your favourite techniques.

I use the sturdy and efficient German-made Kutrimmer 1038 Paper Cutter that I got for my birthday and that is miles away from the very bad one I was using from Staples. It makes a very pleasing thunk sound when you chop. I try not to be too exact or deliberate about cutting which is a moment that fills me with dread because I fear I'm cutting too much. But again, I'm impatient and I like to keep things moving and get into a flow. The flow is important because the process of moving images around and finding relationships can take a while. Music and coffee are key. I sometimes use big hole punches to create dimension by incorporating a smaller contained environment onto a bigger one.

I have been drawing a lot more on top of images and often scribble for a while as a way to loosen up before I begin composing. I especially like to draw with cheap pens and magic markers that are running out of ink. I try not over-think the juxtapositions--you kind of know when there's a particular chemistry that works but there are so many possibilities and you have to seize the moment when it works.

Then there are all regretted glued things that go into a drawer to be re-cut or configured later on. I have used many polymer-based adhesives over the years but my glue of choice is UHU acid-free glue stick which gives me the flatness I want and keeps the surface purely what it is without a layer of anything clouding the image. UHU is by far the smoothest of all the sticks and allows me to lift and re-stick repeatedly. I sometimes use a single-edged razor blade for rubbing images down but mostly I just use hands. Glue on the surface happens and must be embraced.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

Besides the collage work, I like to take pictures of little moments while traveling and when I was in Coastal Oregon, we passed a nondescript little village called--I can't remember what it was called, but the inn keeper where we had stayed the night before told us to skip it, describing it as "blue collar." We thankfully went anyway and I discovered it was a crab-trapping port town and there were just stacks and stacks of these old wooden traps full of rope and tags and buoys. There was no sun--the sky was white, it was very misty and the moody daylight was very inspiring. Someone was playing old Elvis while giving their car a wash.

I took hundreds of details of the insides of old traps and dumpsters and afterwards, we bought a steamed and cooled dungeness crab from the little old shack there and ate it on a log at the beach. My favorite collage (the first image in the cut/glue series) is part of a series which incorporates idyllic nature photography from the 70s with images from 1950s-era floor tile catalogs. (see 'about' on website for more on this series) It is a good marriage of the fake and the real, nature and the opposite of nature.



What other artists do you admire?

Too many, no order. Daniel Buren, Gabriel Orozco, Christian Boltanski, Pippilotti Rist, Patricia Urquiola, David Hammons, Yayoi Kusama, Walter Niedermayr, Tara Donovan, Andreas Gursky, Pierre Bonnard, Willliam Eggleston, Bruce Conner, Rosemarie Trockel, Robert Rauschenberg, Diane Arbus, Sigmar Polke, Jeff Depner, Louise Bourgeois, Pedro Almodovar, Cy Twombly, Milton Glaser, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Dieter Rams, George Maciunas, Roxy Paine, James Gallagher, Eva Vermeiren

Thanks Leslie!

Daniel Zender - Notpaper

Daniel Zender

Sorry for the little lapse, Notpaper is based out of Canada again!

First post of the new year is Daniel Zender, whose collages immediately caught my eye. Abstract collages can be a challenge I find, but Daniel seems to see things this way easily. While most of us look to the subject of a photograph, Daniel sees the background and shapes of the negative space... and he creates some wonderfully fluid collages with them.


Daniel Zender
http://danielzender.com/index.php?/random/artworks/
Springfield, MO


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

My collage work is: surreal, colorful, spontaneous, fun, stimulating, weird, um....

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

I find photographs, and use the blocks of colors in the backgrounds of them for the majority of my work. Sometimes I use construction paper or halftone textures from photocopies, and recently letraset typography for some poster work.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

Not until very recently did I start dabbling in collages. I was looking for a way to play outside of my conceptual, client based design and illustration work.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I also teach a design class at Missouri State University and work at a coffeehouse occasionally.

Do you have any formal art training?

I have my BFA from MSU.

Explain your favourite techniques.

Sketching, then silkscreen, cutting and pasting, inking, and experimenting always.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

The one that comes to mind first is an image I made of Little Red Riding Hood, which I created first using cut paper, and colored digitally. It takes everyone a second to see the wolf, which is why I love it so much. Also, I have gotten some freelance work out of it, so that is nice too.



What other artists do you admire?

Too many to name, and not enough related to collage to really mention... recently I have been really digging Fortunato Depero.

Thanks Daniel!

B. A. Lampman - Notpaper

B. A. Lampman

Collage portraits are always so interesting, it's fun to see how people approach them (and usually seem very complicated to me). These collage drawings by B.A. Lampman are a great combination--I love the ghostly white outlines on patterned paper. They remind me in atmosphere of Teri Donovan's collage paintings, which makes me like them even more.


B.A. Lampman
www.balampman.blogspot.com, also www.inflatableeye.com
Victoria, BC, Canada


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Tells a story, though no-one's sure what it's about.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

I like to work primarily with magazines and illustrated books from the 50's, 60's, and 70's. I use whatever appeals to me--it could be people, or background stuff, or patterns.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

In art school I was painting more than anything else, and during my last year there I was painting on un-stretched (loose) canvas that had pieces of canvas "collaged" on top (I would collage first and then paint on top of all the layers). I have no memory of what prompted me to start doing that. At the same time I started doing collage in my sketchbook--again, I have no memory of what prompted it (this would be about 20 years ago). I do think that what cemented my relationship with collage a couple of years later was having limited space and a toddler to deal with--I could find a little space at the kitchen table to cut & paste, but painting large canvases was something else entirely.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I have worked for many years at an art supply store. For the last few years I have been their "educational salesperson", selling art supplies to teachers and schools. I am also the mail order person, plus I answer all email queries to do with art supplies, et cetera.

Do you have any formal art training?

I have a Bachelor of Fine Arts (with Distinction) from Concordia University in Montreal.

Explain your favourite techniques.

I have amassed quite a number of the above-mentioned magazines and illustrated books, and my favourite part of the process is leafing through them to find something that piques my interest (I don't normally start with any particular idea in mind, unless I am doing a CD cover or something like that). As I go along I'll find things that I think will look good together, or better yet that make me laugh when they're put together. I always say I'm going to try and work more quickly and loosely, but I rarely do. I usually end up spending a long time carefully constructing a scene that seems to have a strong narrative, whether I intend it to or not. Having said that, my last batch were all faces--I started combining collage and painting, and I think I've opened a can of worms that is far from exhausted (if you can exhaust a can of worms. I bet you can).

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

I honestly don't have one favourite. I have opinions on which pieces are better and which are weaker, but no absolute favourites.



What other artists do you admire?

I'm sure there are many, but the three that are springing to mind right now are Peter Doig, Shary Boyle, and Wayne White.

Thanks B.A.!

Ashley Joseph Edwards - Notpaper

Ashley Joseph Edwards


Ashley Joseph Edwards
http://www.flickr.com/photos/47385468@N08/
Kent, United Kingdom


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Imaginative/Crazy/Triangles/Abstraction/Distortion/The World Through my Eyes.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

Vintage Images, family sourced photos, black and white images, 1950's photographs in particular.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I've been seriously collaging for the past couple of years now. I discovered collage when I was in my first year at Kingston University when one of my friends introduced me to the work of Julien Pacaud, seeing his work was a true inspiration having never seen anything like it before. Around this time I had been given over 1000 images from my Grandads past, they were from the 1950's and 1960's, intrigued by the work of Julien I wanted to give collage a go, using my grandads photos, the combination of bold colours and shapes I discovered my own style of collage.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

By profession I'm a Graphic Designer, collage and Graphic design come hand in had, without what I've learnt from my graphics I wouldn't be able to create the collages that I do, considering that most of them are digitally made.

Do you have any formal art training?

Graphic Design.

Explain your favourite techniques.

All my projects start with a drawing of a concept that I've thought about (strangely most of my best ideas come from when I'm in the back seat of a car). After discovering what I want to create, I go about finding the images, im constantly saving/scanning/taking photos so I look through my files to see if I can find the specific images that Im looking for. In some cases I print out all the images and use a craft knife to assemble/balance the collage, but most of my collages are assembled on the computer, I like the clean cuts that you can achieve on the computer that aren't possible by hand, also the wide variations of colours that can be easily added.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

My favorite piece is my most recent '//city//retreat//', It shows how when you live in the city you can only but wish to be in the fresh open air.



What other artists do you admire?

Julian pacaud, Mario Wagner

Thanks Ashley!

Lola Dupre - Notpaper

Lola Dupre

Lola creates surreal distorted portraits, some made of shattered fragments, exploded features, and some loopy figures I would certainly call dali-esque. I think they're great, she's creating a new perspective with each collaged caricature.

Also worth mentioning is her first solo show, Shrapnel, featuring new Exploded Portraits opening this Saturday (tomorrow!) at Phone Booth Gallery in Long Beach, Caifornia. Reception 7-10pm. Runs until November 5th.


Lola Dupre
www.loladupre.com/
Glasgow, Scotland


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Paper shards heaped onto wood panels.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

A4 prints of magazine images, vintage photographs, and images obtained directly in collaboration with photographers.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

About 12 years, a love for the accessibility of it.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

Solely an artist and illustrator.

Do you have any formal art training?

Architecture.

Explain your favourite techniques.

The stretching and distortion of the unstretchable.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

Almost always this is simply the last piece or pieces I made.



What other artists do you admire?

Many, my closest inspiration is the fellow collage artist I am currently working with, the amazing Yvonne Chiffon.

Thanks Lola!

Elo Designs - Notpaper

Elo Designs

Elo makes fun and playful digital collages, his work really caught my eye. What I like about it especially is that he's not afraid to combine multiple time periods in his pieces. I see a definite Victorian style as well as a retro 60s look in his work.


Elo Designer
www.elodesigns.com
I'm from San Diego, California


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Art with an edge and no limits.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

I like to work with a little bit of everything. Old magazines, stock images, vignette images, and vintage vector drawings. I also make my own textures and brushes. I think that's why they called it collage right? because you can put all those pieces together when creating a composition.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

Well, when I came out of graphic school about 2 years ago, I thought graphic arts would be more of a creative world and not so repetitive. I thought I would be able to create and express my ideas freely. I was wrong and I knew I had to do something to express my artistic side to the world. Although I took lots of drawing classes, I still suck at it (laughs). But I have great illustration ideas. I think creating photo illustrations (collage) was an answer to my frustrations for not being able to create beautiful drawings or perfect sketches. Collage has been a great part of my life since I was a kid even before I went to design school.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I am a graphic designer with a degree. I love to do packaging designs, work on concepts and new identities. I've got some awards on packaging and I think that is one of my main passions in design. I'm always more demanding than my clients, and I never put out a logo or a design until I'm 100% happy with it. Even when my clients say that they are happy with my designs, I still ask a little bit of more time to push it a little bit further.

Do you have any formal art training?

Yes I do. I have a graphic arts degree and a web design certificate.

Explain your favourite techniques.

My favorite techniques are no techniques. When you do collage you have put stuff together, understand balance, understand the golden ratio, how to match colors, understand "The Gestalt Principles." You have to know when it's time to add or subtract but that is all more technical. But they all help!

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

My art pieces are like my babies (laughs) I hate to see them go. But it's awarding when you see someone wearing what you have designed. I did an art exhibition and I saw people buying them. Only 4 were left but I still wanted to keep them all. I actually don't have a favorite one. I still have tons that I didn't like and thought wouldn't be worth showing. It's like when a singer creates a new album. You edit and put only the best to the public. I like all the ones out there!



What other artists do you admire?

In pop art I like Andy Warhol, in graphic arts I like Karin Hashid and Michael Graves. They are all genius!

Thanks Elo!

Justin Angelos - Notpaper

Justin Angelos

Justin's collages have a really great energy, featuring geometric shapes and strong--which overtake the subjects in quite a powerful way. He's not afraid to work in different mediums to get the message across, and each piece is so different but they all have that electric nature!


Justin Angelos
www.justinangelos.com
Grew up in San Diego now in Santa Cruz


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

A strange stew of mixed media, collage and assemblage.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

My palette consists of just about anything and everything--old mags, found wood and rusted metal, animal parts, family photos and the debris of my childhood.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I've been creating collage/assemblage for as long as I can remember. As a kid I spent countless hours in the backroom of my mom's florist shop watching her assemble the most amazing arrangements from flowers, dead insects and taxidermy




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I am also a full time stay at home dad.

Do you have any formal art training?

2 years of advertising school and misc jr. college art classes.

Explain your favourite techniques.

It depends on the piece but there's something meditative and soothing about holding a pair of scissors in you hand and searching for the right image to extract and use to create something new.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

WOW! I fall in love with almost everything I make.



What other artists do you admire?

Rauschenberg, Joesph Cornell, The Date Farmers, Robert Hardgrave, Aj Fosik, Kris Kuksi, Lola Dupre, Monica Canilao, Hobby Horse Collective, Abandonview just to name a few.

Thanks Justin!

Ryan Sarah Murphy - Notpaper

Ryan Sarah Murphy

Ryan's collages are so interesting, they exude simplicity and complexity at the same time. The cardboard gives a lovely, sculptural quality to what otherwise would be some very contemporary cut and paste! I'm also curious to know how she finds all that coloured cardboard.


Ryan Sarah Murphy
www.ryansarahmurphy.com
New York, NY


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Restrained, urban/natural landscape, construction/destruction.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

I've been using found, colored cardboard collected from all sorts of boxes, packaging and containers. And glue.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I have always been drawn to collage-based works on paper though initially my concentration was sculpture. These cardboard collages satisfy a need to construct objects, make lines and apply colors, so for me they often feel like a combination of sculpture, drawing and painting.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I work as a studio assistant to a Brooklyn-based stone sculptor.

Do you have any formal art training?

I received my BFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York.

Explain your favourite techniques.

I basically collect and hoard materials that catch my eye, cut out & tear colors, shapes and thicknesses, and assemble forms rather organically, growing and constructing them piece by piece.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

My favorite piece always changes as it's usually the most current piece I've made. The latest collage I've completed is called "Dear, Dear Surface". It's one of the largest pieces I've made and has a sort of dual static/floating quality.



What other artists do you admire?

Maria Elena-Gonzalez, John Beech, Agnes Martin, Mona Hatoum, Rosie Lee Tompkins, Richard Diebenkorn, Mies van der Rohe.

Thanks Ryan!

Matthew Sage - Notpaper

Matthew Sage

Matthew cleverly uses landscapes in setting the backdrop for his collages. The way he cuts and reassembles them gives them an almost 3-dimensional quality, each piece is just shifted into place. Very enjoyable!


Matthew Sage
http://patientsounds.blogspot.com & http://brokenfocus.blogspot.com/
Fort Collins, Colorado


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

Landscape, Shapes, History, Skateboard, Pattern, Line, Language, Void, Minimalism

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

National Geographic (vintage), Thrasher Magazine (current), drawing paper, sketchbooks, acrylic artists ink, water, pencil, random found paper textures (most recently a weird set of hand writing analysis cards I found in the basement). Also for like 2 years I collaged using stuff from this box of haunted seventeen magazines from the 60-70s. But then a ghost (the former owner of said seventeen magazines?) gave me pneumonia, so I quit.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

Started collaging in junior high... making flyers/posters/artwork for me and my friends imaginary punk bands. I've been doing the same thing ever since, except the bands became a little more real...




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I am a dishwasher by day, a poet on weekends early in the morning, a musician in the evenings, a cassette tape label manager in my spare time... and I own a dog who likes to run and jump. Also, I am addicted to the internet, which is a full time job.

Do you have any formal art training?

I studied Poetry at Colorado State University, and many of the ideas from poetry carried over into my visual art. I also broke the rules at CSU and took art classes though I was not an art major. I studied drawing for a semester.

Explain your favourite techniques.

I like combining patterns and rigid shapes with fluid forms. I like visualizing the abstraction of people and man-made geometry as cast into a fractured landscape. I like how I, the collagist, cut a magazine, pictures (buildings, skylines, rolling hills, people) up into interpretations, but really that magazine is a tree that has already been cut and printed and cut and formed to communicate something as an interpretation of itself. I am re-assessing a re-assessed knowledge as communicated through media. It is like one of the most ultimate found poems to me.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

Elusive; in that it does not exist yet, but will one day...



What other artists do you admire?

Tiffanie Collins, Grant Souders, Alex Runge, Erik Wangsvick, Brett Brady, Mikheil Moucharaffie. That is my crew...as for bigger names: Clyfford Still, Ed Templeton, Chris Johanson, Uta Barth, Ian Mckaye, Townes Van Zandt, Ben Chasney, David Lynch, Will Oldham, Mark Gonzales. Skateboarding. Loud music.

Thanks Matthew!

Ettore Cavaliere - Notpaper

Ettore Cavaliere

Ettore's collages are really lovely--strong, colorful, and experimental. I love how he intertwines images together but also adds in geometric elements (usually it's done one way or the other!)


Ettore Cavaliere
www.flickr.com/illomografo/
Salerno, Italy


Describe your work in 10 words or less.

My works are a collage of images arousing emotions for their colour or their subject.

What do you like to work with (magazines, photographs, vintage)? Be specific!

I like working with magazines and photos.

How long have you been creating collages and what made you start?

I started with collages about three years ago because I love this technique and I have reproduced it on the computer too.




Are you solely an artist, or do you work in another profession?

I'm not solely an artist, I'm an advertising and editorial graphic designer.

Do you have any formal art training?

No, I'm self-taught. I started painting and drawing.

Explain your favourite techniques.

My favourite techniques are the repetition of image and image cut.

Describe your favourite piece ever created.

I haven't any favourite piece because I think even the most beautiful one stops being that after a while.



What other artists do you admire?

I like pop art like Andy Warhol and Rauschenberg. I also like Mimmo Rotella's and Jacques Villeglé's decollages.

Thanks Ettore!

Notpaper is a blog dedicated to showcasing the work of international collage artists. We strive to meet the artists and understand the thoughts behind the process, so interviews with artists are a big part of what we do. If you are new to the site, please enjoy our archives featuring hundreds of collagists!   more 

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Books

  • The Collage Workbook




    "How to get started and stay inspired"

    132 pages, Published by Lark Crafts (June 5, 2012), ISBN: 1454701994.

    Available from Lark Crafts.
    - - - - - - - - -

  • BOLO Magazine 1




    "Stars Are Indispensible"

    96 pages in 2 colors, black and blue, 17 x 21.5 cm, 45 contributors from all over the world. The main theme is: "Stars are indispensable". It contains a music cd with 19 tracks.

    Available from BOLO store.

    - - - - - - - - -

  • WAFA Zine 03




    "Everything At Every Moment Is Awaiting Your Arrival."

    Limited Edition of 50 copies. Full color, 3.75 x 5″. Embossed front cover. Hand-sewn Japanese stab stitch binding. Edition number of 50, hand-numbered on reverse.

    Available from WAFA Storefront.

    - - - - - - - - -

  • Masters: Collage


    Major Works by Leading Artists

    Curated by Randel Plowman

    This superb new collection offers a stunning look at contemporary collage work from approximately 40 leading artists.

    Available from Lark Books.

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